Jottings From the School Diary – Summer Term 1917

SUMMER TERM, 1917.

Wednesday May 2nd – Miss Douglas spoke of the beautiful promise of Spring; how life was throbbing and breathing all around us, and how we must make a tremendous effort to throw the best of us into our work and play and all that we do, and to do what we do thoroughly. She told us that “Alan became a living soul,” pulsating with life and energy, and that we must throw our energy into every bit of work we do. We heard that J. Carter and G. Bacchus had both passed their Music Examinations successfully, also that K. Connah had won a Council Exhibition at the Royal College of Music.

Saturday, May 5th – Some Artistes, who have been visiting the Camps, gave a free Concert in the School Hall.

Monday, May 7th – One hundred girls in 5 shifts of 20, went to plant potatoes in 70 allotments belonging to widows and soldiers’ wives. The work was finished in three days instead of four, as expected.

Thursday, May 10th – Work for the day stopped at four o’clock, and the Forms went to different places for expeditions. Everyone had a delightful time.

Monday May 14th – The Sing Competition took place. Dr. Alcock very kindly came to judge. School House won the Shield, with a total of 72 marks out of a maximum of 100. Nelson was second with 62 marks.

We heard that Margaret Fawcett, who is working with one of the Scottish Women’s Hospital Units, has been presented with a Medal for service rendered to Romanian wounded. Extract from Margaret’s letter: “We had a visit before nine o’clock this morning from Prince Dolgoroukoff and several Generals, and they gave us all Medals. They are silver with orange and black ribbon.”

Tuesday, May 15th – Lady Hulse gave the School two beautiful volumes of “Shakespeare’s England,” an account of the life and man­ners of his time.

Wednesday, May 16th – Rogation Day. The School joined in the procession at St. Martin’s and walked round the Parish. Prayers were offered at the allotments.

Thursday. May 17th – Ascension Day. We went, as usual, to the eight o’clock Celebration at St. Martin’s. The younger ones had their Ascension Day Service with Miss Lucy. The rain came, which put all thoughts of a picnic at Old Sarum out of the question. However, we spent a very jolly afternoon in the Hall playing games. We ended the day with a short Service at School. The Sale of Work fills much of our time and thought. Three evenings a week and two hours oil Saturday are given to working for it.

Thursday, May 24th – Empire Day. Miss Douglas gave us a short address at Morning Prayers about Empire Day, and at 12 o’clock we assembled to hear the King’s Proclamation read and to sing “God Save the King.” In the afternoon, we went for House Picnics.

Monday, May 28th – Miss Gray, High Mistress of St. Paul’s Girls’ School, spoke on the importance of teaching as National Service. (See special notice.)

Wednesday, May 30th – The Junior Literary Club met in the Wilderness garden, and Forms I, II, III. and Lower IV., acted original plays to a much-delighted audience. (See special notice.)

Thursday, May 31st – We went for House picnics. The weather was perfect and everyone enjoyed herself. School and Fawcett played off their Cricket Match, as Fawcett had been invited to Breamore on Saturday.

Thursday. June 7th – The Annual School Service was held In Southwark Cathedral. Owing to the war, we could not send any representatives. We had special Collects and a Collection at Morning Prayers £1 2s. 5d.

Tuesday, June 5th – A Service in memory of Lord Kitchener and those who have fallen in the war was held. Lady Hulse spoke. (See special notice.)

Wednesday, June 20th– Miss Douglas told us at Morning Prayers that Peggy Deanesley won a Fellowship at Newnham College: ­”The following Fellowship, have been awarded at Newnham College The Mary Bateson Fellowship to Miss M. Deanesley, who proposes to conclude and publish her historical work upon `The Wvcliffite Bible: Its Antecedents and Its Fate,’ and to write and publish a further monograph upon `Religious Education from the 10th to the 14th Century.'”

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