News of Old Mistresses and Girls – Christmas Term 1917

Monica Savory tells us that she passed Responsions in July, so hopes to go to St. Hugh’s next October. She is now working at the Warwick Record Office. She says: “A great deal of the work has to do with the casualties, and in one section they send out the notice to the next ­of kin when the men are killed or wounded. We get in all the documents belonging to the men, their attestations, medical histories, wills, &c., and we keep a record of all their military service, wounds, medals, campaigns, and all particulars about their families.”

Dorothy Lowe, writing about the usual date for Commem, says “I feel to-day we ought all to be travelling Salisbury roads,” She had had a lovely week-end with Joe Hensley, and had run up against Naomi Peak and had also come across May Dickinson at the massage examinations. She has got her first massage post at Cambridge in the 1st Eastern General Hospital, 24 big wards all huts. She says her brother was near Arras with a search light.

Eva Tatham is still a Clerk in the 4th Southern General Hospital at Plymouth. Her uncle has been made a Brigadier-General and head of all Naval and Marine Recruiting at the Admiralty. She says she was given 24 hours’ leave, so was able to be bridesmaid to Phillipa Murray (nee Kitchener). Phillipa’s husband is in the R.F.C. and in Palestine.

Mary Gordon, obtained the Certificate of Merit in Letters (equivalent to the B. Litt.) for her thesis on Greek Oligarchies at Oxford. She says “My Oxford life seems quite far away now after a term in Man­chester. I am very happy indeed here, and like the school and the girls and my work and my colleagues very much.”

Dorothy Kent writes from Durham. She says she and Joan Shorto meet and talk Godolphin. Her brother, who has had to be put into C3 Class owing to a bad knee, is now in the High Commissioner’s Office in London. She gives an interesting account of the soldiers’ huts in Durham, and says how busy every body is preparing eggs, salads, vegetables, fruit, sandwiches, cake, tea, coffee, and cocoa.

Isabel Rennie is working in the laundry of the Hospital at Sidmouth, and says the laundry work she learnt in LoweriV. has come in very useful.

Chrissy Leslie-Jones (nee Baskett) is leaving her home in Lahore, as the following notice will explain. We congratulate her upon her husband’s appointment to the Principalship of the Mayo College: ­”Your readers have already learnt of the appointment of Mr. F. A. Leslie-Jones to the Principalship of the Mayo College, Ajmer, and Mrs. and Mr. Leslie-Jones’ consequent departure from Lahore, where they have resided for thirteen years. It is difficult to think of a change which could occasion more widespread regret in the Province. As head of the institution through which the scions of the leading Indian families pass on their way to manhood. Mr. Leslie-Jones has, of course, played a very important role in the political life of the Punjab, and his loss will be a very real one to Indians. The active part moreover which lie and his wife have taken in promoting sport among the European community in the Capital, and their untiring support of all social in­stitutions and undertakings have been so very marked that their places will be very difficult to fill. A cricket week without ‘L.J.’ and a Punjab tennis tournament without Mrs. Leslie-Jones will be hard to imagine. Still Ajmer is not so very far away, and we may see something of them occasionally.”

Ruth Strange is nursing at The Anglo-Russia Hospital, Petrograd, Stephanie Strange is about to commence work with the motor trans­port, the small V.A.D. Hospital where they were previously working being temporarily closed.

P. Turner sends an interesting account of her first term at St. Paul’s School. She has gone into the VI. 3 Form and likes her work very much. If she gets her remove next year she is expected to take the Senior Cambridge. She says she has spoken to Miss Ash, she also says “I am getting up a little party which we call the Godolphin Re-union. We are asking as many Old Godolphinites as we can collect to lunch and tea on November 18th. Yvorne Leys is helping us. There is Miss Hymans de Tiel and Dacre Alexander and Eva Bartruni, from the Medical School, and Jean Chapman and Phyllis Clark live quite near us. I am so looking forward to it.”

Gladys Scott says: “This is just a very short letter to tell you that I am going to Paris next seek to be secretary to a great friend of my chief (who is still in India). He is running the Y.M.C.A. for the American troops. I think the work should be very interesting, and he writes that there is plenty of it!”

Nancy Humphries is nursing in the Royal Naval Hospital, Truro. She has been there since the Hospital opened nearly two years ago and likes it very much. Olive Prater cooks at a Red Cross Hospital in Budleigh Salterton.

Phyllis Codwin is learning how to drive an ambulance. She hopes to drive the wounded straight from Southampton to hospitals in Winchester.

Kathleen Sargeaunt is getting on splendidly with her cooking and housecraft at Malvern.
Lilly Shannon is living in London and preparing for a secretary’s post.
Nancy Northcroft is going on with her music and helping at home.

Katharine Hulbert is among the Wiltshire nurses whose names have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War for valu­e able services rendered in connection with the war.

S. Yorke is working for a degree in Agriculture at St. Andrew’s Hall, Reading, and she much enjoys the training.

J. Hinxman is busy helping at home, where she takes some of the lessons in the morning and works at a Red Cross Hospital in the after­noons.

M. Holmes is orderly at Longford Castle Hospital.
C. Preece is nursing in the officers’ ward at Queen Mary’s Hospital for Women in London.
L. Poynton packs for the A.O.D. voluntary workers at Didcot near her home, and meets Ursula Armitage at the same work.

Lucy Seton, having had previous training, went as V.A.D. to Drum­tochty Castle, Kincardineshire, when war broke out, it being lent as a V.A.D. Hospital. When it closed a year afterwards, she came to Edinburgh, and worked in a private nursing home for some months. From Edinburgh she went to the hospital at Balham and was there till August, 1916, and then proceeded to St. Paul’s Hospital at Malta. She remained there till it was re-organised as the 63rd General Hospital and sent to Salonika. She re-engaged with it and accompanied it to Salonika, where she now is, for, at any rate, a further period of six months.

Constance Wollastan, after doing various odd war jobs, was trained as a policewoman, and was sent to Gretna Munition Factory, and thence to Carlisle. She was promoted Sergeant, June, 1917. She was moved shortly afterwards to East Riggs, Dumfriesshire. She was obliged to resign at the end of September as she was ill, but after a period of rest and convalescence with friends in Scotland, she was appointed Assistant Welfare Superintendent at Elswick Works, Newcastle-on­Tyne, at the end of October, 1917.

Margaret Fawcett, who has been in Russia with the Scottish Women’s Hospital Unit. has received a medal, and we send her through the maga­zine our heartiest congratulations. In writing to her mother she says “We had a visit before nine o’clock this morning from Prince Dolgo­roudoff and several Generals and we were all given medals ; they are silver with orange and black ribbon.”

We also congratulate May Wyld (Florence Maria Wyld), Member of; the Order of the British Empire. For work in the Secunderabad Hospitals for sick and wounded from Mesopotamia.

Ena de Jersey sends a, very interesting account from Guildford of her work in a hostel for National Service Girls working. on the land. She says “This hostel started on June 14th as a training centre, but now that the colder weather has set in it is more of a depot where they come whilst waiting for places. My friend, Miss Perrean, is the superintendent and I am her A.D.C.; in other words. I am the house parlormaid, general bottle washer, and her secretary into the bargain. I simply love the life, though it is pretty hard work. There is no time to be bored with its monotony, as we live in a perpetual state of never knowing what is going to happen next. On the whole we have some very nice girls. They are mostly drawn from the servant class, they wear the breeches and overalls and are called by their surnames. The day’s work is as follows: Getting up bell at 6 a.m., breakfast at 6.45, then one girl stays at home each day to help in the house, which has to be done from top to bottom every day, the girls have to be on the farms at 8 a.m., and they take their lunches with them; they knock off work at 5 p.m., and come home for a big meal at 6 o’clock, known as tea, though they have meat and pudding and cups of tea.”

May Bailey writes: “At present, I am working at the County Second­ary School, Wolverton, Bucks, as an assistant mistress. I have full charge of the domestic work, which includes cookery, housewifery, laundry and needlework. For this work I have a special building adjoining the school, which is quite new. This work was not done in the school previous to my appointment. As all forms (I.-VI.) take domestic work, most of my time is occupied with it. The Food Control Committee for this district arranged for war lectures on economy in food to be given in this neighbourhood and district. These lectures they kindly invited me to give, I have just completed them, three a week for the last seven weeks.

A. Currey is working hard with Girl Guides in Capetown.
W. Harvey-Jones is also doing excellent work with Girl Guides at Bexhill.
P. Riddle has gone to Miss Jones at Grahamstown to teach mathematics in her school.
B. Knowles is housemaid in a hospital at Harpenden
S. and H. Toms go alternate months to the officers’ hospital at Watermouth Castle. ‘
E. Charlton (Brown) is living in Maida Vale, her husband is in hospital in London.
D. Wilson is driving the Salisbury Red Cross Ambulance.
Miss Ashford has gone for six months to a military hospital in Norfolk.

Miss Fairclough has been moved to Alexandria and is taking charge of the invalid kitchen at the 78th General Hospital. It is a Convalescent Hospital, and she starts her day by making 47 pints of “Benger.” All milk having to be boiled on paraffin New Perfection stoves, and she only has six burners!

M Saunders, Irene Morrice and H. C. Livesay are kitchen maids at the Salisbury Red Cross Hospital.

A. Hubbock (Parish) is living in Glasgow and helping in the War Depot.
L. Delacombe is still working at munitions at “Park Royal.” Her particular work is overlooking the girls who are making cartridges.
D. Moore is working at the Art School in Edinburgh.
Enid Carter has gone to Paris to be with her father for six months.
Miss Luce and Miss Williamson are both teaching at the “Ladies’ College” in Jersey.

Miss Ralph is to be house mistress of a new boarding house at Miss Jones’ School in Grahamstown.
M. Knowles goes to the Y.M.C.A. canteens at week-ends and also works at a War Depot at Harpenden.

Janet Dennison is working as Quartermaster’s Orderly at Christ­church V.A.D. Hospital, and loves the work.

Helen Theodosius is studying the Froebel system of teaching in order to take up kindergarten work. She is also hoping to continue her music with Miss Fanny Davies, but at present is not allowed to use one of her wrists for playing.

Madge Glynn is studying shorthand and typewriting to fit herself for secretarial work.

Rosamond Burne (Wolley-Dodd) sends a jolly photograph of her little girl aged 16 months, and has a wee son too now. She says Marjorie is nursing in Cheshire, and Nancy is a V.A.D. in France.

K. Lewis tells of her jolly family of boys all enjoying their life on the farm at Bentley and helping to cut up between 16 and 30 bushels of swedes a day. Her husband has got the D.S.O. and was twice mentioned in despatches last year. We heartily congratulate her and him.

Vera Morrison is working every day on a farm, milking and butter making; and poultry, taking a man’s place, and her baby is all the better for living in the country. Her address is Elmbrook, Clear Down, Woking.
Ivy Hutchins is nursing at Chatham.
Norah Montgomery is very busy at canteen work, clerk’s cafe, and packing parcels for prisoners.

Quite a large company of Godolphinites are at the School of Medicine: Miss Hynams de Tiel, Merell Middlemore, Dacre Alexander, Eva Bartram, Dolly Turner.

Miss Wyld and Mrs. Everett “We said good-bye as usual to Miss Wyld before the Christmas holidays, and we were destined never to see her again. The loss, however, was compensated for by the punctual arrival of Mrs. Everett at the beginning of the term. We celebrated the exchange on the first, morning of the term by a prolonged and hearty clap for (xciwra1 and i1lrs. Everett, and again through the pages of the magazine we want to convey to them our very heartiest best wishes. General Everett has gone back to Salonika after his short leave, and Fawcett House has been able to welcome Mrs. Everett back for a time.