U.G.S.M Settlement – Summer Term 1917

OLD GIRLS, PLEASE READ!
DEAR OLD GIRLS,
You are so splendid lots and lots of you-in the work you are doing now, that the Magazine with its news of you carries a thrill, of which perhaps even the Commem, thrill was only a premonition, to those of us who are stay-at-homes (we humbly hope not slackers).
Salaam to every one of you, and more strength to your elbows!
I think that we understand how very difficult it must be in the midst of such hard and pressing; work to give much thought to anything not immediately connected with the war. But will you please try to spare a minute to listen to our tale of woe?
I’ve had a bad fright. You will remember that at Commem, 1912 we agreed to guarantee £45 annually to our Settlement, and hoped that we might very soon increase the amount? Well, at the close of last year I only had £45 19s. 1d. to send in, so we had a very narrow escape, and I wondered how on earth I was to get at you all in time if we ever fell below our guarantee-instead of increasing it, as we hoped.
And then came a second shock. I have been trying to carry on as treasurer until we could meet to elect a new one, but last autumn I had so much other secretarial work to do that I wrote to various members of the finance committee to see if one would take my place. But all were too much engaged in war work, so I am ready to do my best again for a time.
But a phrase in one of the letters sent a “grue” down my spine: “I feel that the Mission has become something very remote, if I am to be quite honest over it.” Now I don’t believe that was anything more than a passing mood, because if our Mission, or anything Godolphin, were indeed “remote” I really don’t know what the “leal” in our motto means.
But it did make me feel that this time is a real test-a chance to show that we have not only loyal hearts, but loyal heads which will take the trouble to be prompt and business-like, and so tighten up the bearings of our O.G.A. organisation, which seem to be running a bit loose. Subscribers, and even in one or two cases group secretaries, vanish into air, and repeated letters bring no answer.
So please everyone will you send your subscription to your group secretary at once, if you have not already done so. And please make it as large as possible, for our Settlement has all the additional claims of war work (they badly need more workers for whole or part time)­ and increased expenses, and needs our backing as never before.
Please, group secretaries, will you send your group subscriptions to me (not direct to the Mission Treasurer), as soon as possible, and at the latest before the end of October, so that we may make quite sure of our guaranteed sum before the end of the year. Last year two groups sent direct, instead of to me, and another did not arrive until the middle of January, so our total was not quite so bad as I feared, though more than 31, less than last year, and 81, below 1914. But neither the Mission Treasurer nor I can trace any subscription from one group, and I am uncertain about the names or addresses of some secretaries. Will the secretaries of Groups 4, 12, 13, 14 kindly communicate with me.
And if anyone is obliged to resign, please let me know, and tell me the name of your successor.
And lastly, forgive this lengthy wail from your humble treasurer.

E.E. BALCH

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