School News – Summer 1916

Thursday, May 4th, School re-opened. After greetings Miss Douglas, gave out that next holidays will begin on July 27th, mark reading being on July 26th, and that half-term would begin on June 16th. She also said that nice subscriptions had been brought back towards the Star and Garter Home for totally disabled soldiers. Three hundred Schools have now joined the Patriotic Union, and between us we hope to raise £2000.

At the Arts and Crafts Exhibition, held at Wilton, Muriel Box won the cup for the doll which she had dressed. She was at the head of the Junior Section. As the cup can only be held in Wiltshire, it is to be kept at Fawcett House, although Muriel has left.
As we met together this year directly after Easter, Miss Douglas gave us an Easter motto for the term: “Therefore let us keep the Feast.”
Friday, May 6th, The School went to see a most interesting cinematograph, showing splendid pictures of the Navy and of the “New Army” in training.
Thursday, May 10th, A new plan has been arranged for Thursday afternoons. Preparation is from 2 to 4, and after that we are free to go for house, form or natural history expeditions.
Wednesday, May 17th Canon Sowter came to say goodbye to us before going to Ireland. He took our Intercession Service and then spoke a few words.
Wednesday, May 24th, Empire Day. (See special notice.)
May 29th, Lady Hulse spent the day at the School, and in the afternoon saw some of the Boarding Houses and the games.
Thursday, May 25th, Miss Eastgate, helped by some of the Music Mistresses, planned a “Shakespeare Afternoon.” and arranged the following delightful programme for it:

PROGRAMME.
Overture “Coriolanus” Beethoven.
Reading “Coriolanus”
“Julius Caesar.”
Song “Who is Sylvia?” Shubert.
”Two Gentlemen of Verona.”
Song “O Willow Willow” Music of Shakespeare’s time.
“Othello.”
Reading “Richard II.”
Song “Sigh no more, ladies ” Stevens.
“ Love’s Labour’s Lost.”
Song “It was a lover and his lass” Thomas Morley.
”As You Like It.”
Reading “Merchant of Venice ”
Song “Orpheus with his Lute” Sullivan.
Henry VIII.
Reading “Macbeth”
Song “Where the bee sucks” Arne
”The Tempest.”
Reading “Midsummer Nights Dream”
Overture “Midsummer Night’s Dream” Mendelssohn.

Wednesday, May 31st, Stephen Graham came to tell us about Russia.
Thursday. June 1st, Ascension Day. We went as usual to the 8 o’clock Celebration at St. Martin’s. The younger ones had their Ascension Day Service with Miss Lucy at 10 o’clock. We went to Wishford by the 12.45 train. We had a perfectly lovely afternoon at Grovely, and though the weather was rather unsettled, we had hardly any rain until we were on our way home. We ended the day with a little service at School, at which we sang our hymn for Spring.
Monday, June 5th, We rejoiced that the big Naval battle was so great a victory, though it has cost so many their lives.
Tuesday, June 6th, We heard the terrible news that H.M.S, “Hampshire” had been sunk, and that Lord Kitchener and his Staff, who were on their way to Russia, had gone down with her.
Wednesday. June 7th, Miss Douglas said that we would sing the Ascension Day hymn, and she read the Ascension Day collect, which was particularly appropriate at the moment, when the Strengthening comfort of the Holy Spirit was so greatly needed. In speaking of the death of Lord Kitchener, she said:
“We meet to pay a tribute to a very great Englishman, a tribute of grief, and a tribute of pride, to his life and Work, a tribute, too, of sympathy with our King and with very single soldier in the Regular Army and in Kitchener’s own Army. Whether we think of Kitchener as the one who vindicated in Egypt the work of the soldier saint, or as Chief of the Staff of the Forces in South Africa, or as Commander-in-Chief in India, we recognise the greatness of a life wholly given to the service of his, country in the performance of duty”.
Special prayers were then said in commemoration of Kitchener and of the valiant men who had fought and died in the Battle of Jutland.
Thursday, June 8th, Miss Douglas said that although we had not sent any representatives to the United Girls’ Schools’ Service in Southwark, we must remember it, and we had special prayers, thinking particularly of the Mission.
Whit-Sunday, June 11th, We went In the Memorial Service to Lord Kitchener hold at the Cathedral.
Friday, June 16th, Half-Tem holiday, made longer this Year by Friday morning being given in honour of Vera Joscelyne having won a scholarship to Oxford.
All those who did not go away went to Nelson House, where Miss Powell very kindly came to help Miss Edith. Needless to say, they had a most splendid time, and, of course, enjoyed themselves thoroughly.

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Address Given on Empire Day – Summer 1916

By H. M. BAGNALL
Let me remind you first why this day, May 24th, was chosen for the Festival of the Empire. It was Queen Victoria’s birthday, and when she died it was chosen that she might be commemorated always with the Empire which grew to such greatness in her long and wonderful reign. The Colonies had long kept it with enthusiasm as Victoria Day; slowly we have risen to the appeal to join them in making it a yearly Commemoration of the Empire. This year, 1916, for the first time, even the Government is keeping it, and the flag is to fly on all Government buildings.
Salisbury has kept it several times, before the war broke out, but last year it was not kept, on account of the war. Why, then, keep it this year? Just because we have a clearer sense of the tremendous emergency, and we know we must rally every ounce of will and faith and hope to carry through what we have undertaken. Our great Poet of the Empire, Rudyard Kipling, sends us a message this morning.
“When Germany challenged us nearly two years ago to uphold with our lives the ideals by which we professed to live, we accepted the challenge, not out of madness, nor for glory or for gain, but to make good those professions. Since then the Allies and our Empire have fought that they may be free, and all earth may be free, from the intolerable domination of German ideals.
“We did not foresee the size of the task when it opened. We do not flinch from it now the long months have Schooled us to full knowledge, and have tempered us nationally and individually to meet it. The nations within the Empire have created, maintained, and reinforced from their best the great armies they devote without question to this issue. They have emerged, one by one, as Powers clothed with power through discipline and sacrifice, strong for good by their bitter knowledge of the evil they are meeting, and wise in the purchasable wisdom of actual achievement.
“Knowing as nations what it is we fight for, realising as men and women the resolve that has been added to us by what each has endured, we go forward now under the proud banner of our grief’s and losses to greater effort, greater endurance, and, if need be, heavier sacrifice, equal sponsors for the deliverance of mankind.”
There it is. The whole British Empire knows to-day that it is in for a struggle of life or death; that we must stand shoulder to shoulder, all the world round-our men in the front line, we women and girls supporting them by every means at any cost.
And our rallying flag is The Flag that is flying all round the world to-day: the Flag that
“Has braved a thousand years
The battle and the breeze”
The flag of LIBERTY – shown BY the blue of the sea and the air, the freest things we know: and the flag of LAW – the law of self-restraint for the sake of the liberty of others: for the red and white Crosses lie over the blue.
It is so delightful that our School motto means just those two things’ for which our Empire stands – “Franc,” that is free, “Leal”, that is Loyal, law-abiding.
How glad we feel when we see our flag flying to-day, that it does not display an Eagle, Mighty and relentless, keen and terrible. a bird of prey!
And how inexpressibly sad it would be to have a motto like that of the poor misguided men who have caused such bloodshed in Ireland! “Sinn Fein” – “ourselves alone,” what a hopeless and ill-omened war-cry!
But our Flag displays the Cross, and the Cross is “I” crossed out, myself ignored. It is life poured out, first by the Great Captain of our Salvation, then by all who have followed in His train – St. George of England, St. Andrew, St. Patrick, St. David, and all the noble host of heroes and heroines who have given their lives, down to those whom we ourselves have known and loved.
This is what our Empire has to stand for as a province in the Kingdom of Christ – sacrifice for the cause of brotherhood and union. The arms of the crosses of our flag stretch to all points of the compass, and they all meet in one centre. Our Empire stands to bring “more life and fuller” for all peoples, and our flag is a perpetual reminder that that can only come through sacrifice.
In the stirring words at the end of a leading article in to-day’s Daily Telegraphy, “let us not forget that there come great crises in the lives of individuals and of States in which it is rood to be alive. The sacrifice may be heavy, but the privilege is greater still – the privilege of showing ourselves men, the sacred trust which is put into our hands of saving not only ourselves, but humanity at large. Empire Day is a time for high resolves, for unflinching courage, for obstinate endurance, for all those virtues which, giving us a foremost place in the records of civilisation, fortify our stability and safeguard our future.”
That, then, is the call of Empire Day. In the Market-place down below you will stannd with some 2000 other boys and girls – most of them so much poorer than you in the things that make life easy and jolly, and, as we say, “worth having” to you, and yet they too are giving for the great cause their fathers and brothers. Lots of them are saving their pennies by going without sweets, or giving up a visit to the Pictures, which is the gretest pleasure they have. There is no question of “classes” in this war
“Groom fights like noble, squire like knight,
As fearlessly and well,”
and we stand or fall together, we here at home, our men at the front, and our fellow Britons over seas too.
The flag we shall salute in the Market-place was sent to the children of Salisbury by the children of an Australian Salisbury, and a flag which Godolphin helped to send has been flying to-day at a school in New Zealand. We are one to-day in sacrifice under the flag of Liberty and Right; and as we salute it let us renew our vows to be worthy of it – remembering those other great words of Kipling:
“No easy hopes or lies
Shall bring us to our goal,
But iron sacrifice
Of body, will, and soul,
There is but one task for all,
For each one life to give.
Who stands if Freedom fall?
Who dies if England live?”

Empire Day – May 1915

Miss Bagnall gave a short address, showing how the coincidence of Empire Day with Whitsuntide might remind us of the great yearly gathering of King Arthur’s Knighthood in Camelot at the same Feast Pentecost – when the achievement of the Knights in the past year were recounted, and fresh inspiration was gathered for renewed effort and adventure. In the same way our Empire in this time of warfare and stress brings its achievements and its failures before our Ascended King, and seeks afresh the Light and Strength that Whitsuntide bestows. We must remember that the well-being; of the Empire depends on the right-doing and faithfulness of all and each of its members. We as a School are helping to make or mar it; and the School is what its individual girls are. So Empire Day means much for every one of us.

School News – Summer Term 1915

SPRING TERM.

March 8th Mr. Marston, a blind clergyman, came to us and spoke about his work.

March 9th School Service taken by the Rev. H. Marston, who gave an address on Prayer.

March 11th Mr. Belloc’s Lecture. (See last issue.)

March 16th School Service taken by the Rev. A. G. Robertson, who spoke about “excuses.”

Governors’ Meeting.

March 24th School Service taken by Canon Sowter.

March 29th Mark Reading. This was one day earlier than the day fixed owing, to an outbreak of German measles.

Miss Douglas first read the results of the various competitions:

Cloak Room Picture, won by III; three marks lost.

Form Tidy Cup, won by Low. V., Sp. VB and II., who all lost no marks.

Finished Books, Top Up. VI., 78.81 per cent.

Red Girdles. Junior Girdles were given for the first time :¬

Senior: M. Thomas, O. Batchelor, J. Adams, D. Ashford, M. Chilton, P. Clarke, M. Ainslie, S. Lister, N. Richards, E. Hudson, K. Newson, P. Pinneger, V. Coles, and M. Wood.

Junior: M. Allan, M Leys, V. Arnold, G. Coles, M. Rose, M. Du Buisson, and M. Osmond.

La Crosse Pins: S. Yorke, B. Bridge, M. Holmes, H. Elworthy, FT. Elam, M. Godley, and D. Harvey-Jones. Those leaving were :

Special VI., E. Lock, prefect of Fawcett House.

Stanford, St. Margaret’s.

Lower V., M. Chalmers, Fawcett House.

Special VB., Violet Coles, Sarum House.

Lower IV., D. Chalmers, Fawcett House.

II, G. Smyth, Sarum House.

In saying ‘good-bye to those leaving, Miss Douglas said that she hoped that they would remember that the only way to be really happy was by serving others, and that they would stamp their lives with the word “service.” She also said that she hoped that those who were going home would continue there the things they had begun at school. Miss Douglas said she would not say much to the school, as she had had many talks during the term. She hoped all would listen to the lessons of which the holidays would be full-Confirmation for some, Good Friday and Easter, and the message of renewed hope which comes with spring.

March 31st The Confirmation Day. Owing to some of the candidates having had German measles, it was arranged that they should be confirmed separately at St. Mark’s Church by Bishop Joscelyne, at the same hour as the service held in the Cathedral. A few days before Finetta Bathurst was confirmed in Exeter Cathedral, as she had had to go home owing to whooping cough. The following is the full list of the girls who were confirmed this term: C. Mackworth, M. Ainslie, J. Dewe, J. Eason, I. Pears, J. Pears, H. de Behr, P. Blunt, G. Rigden, M. Osmond, M. Hardy, D. Turner, M. Constable, H. Livesey, M. Glynn, P. Clarke, M. Eppstein, P. Godwin, P. Seal, N. Northcroft, K. Sargeaunt, S. Wotton, M. Wood, M. Vines, P. Du Buisson, K. Newson, F. Bathurst.

SUMMER TERM.

April 25th School re-opened on St. George’s Day. The flag was flown, and we sang the hymn, “The Son of God goes forth to War,” and the collect for S. Michael and All Angels was read.

Miss Douglas then read the results of the Associated Board of the R.A.M. and R.C.M., Local Centre, April, 1915.

We were very glad to hear that Canon Sowter was to be a Governor of the School, and clapped heartily.

New Prefect. Fawcett House, M Stevens-Guille.

Miss Douglas read the written rules, and reminded us that there are besides many unwritten rules, which are very important. Their observance comes naturally to those who have the right spirit.

Miss Douglas then spoke a little about the life of St. George and what he stands for. He is the champion of Right fighting for the Cross and prevailing against the Dragon, the type of all that is base, cruel, and deceitful. St. George was taken to be the Patron Saint of England by Edward III., and therefore all English men and women are bound to fight with determination under his banner against all manner of evil.

In the Wiltshire Arts and Crafts Exhibition of April, 1915, B. Niven gained a 1st class certificate for drawing from the round, and R. Ainslie a 1st class certificate for pencil drawing from life. A sheet of brushwork by various girls was also granted a 1st class certificate. A Foljambe’s work was commended.

April 26th Our new Governor, Canon Sowter, brought the Archbishop of Armagh to speak to us. The Archbishop expressed his doubts at being able to talk to girls until he was told to speak as he would to boys. He then told us to remember that the honour of a school depends on its individual members, and he also spoke of the important place of friendship in life, and quoted a boy’s definition of a friend, “One who knows you well and likes you still.”

April 27th Miss Douglas and the Staff went to meet the Archbishop at the Training College, by the invitation of Canon and Mrs. Sowter and Miss Forth, the Principal.

April 28th In the evening the Rev. Denis Victor, of the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa, and the Principal of St. Michael’s College, Likoma, for training native students who become teachers, came and spoke to us about his work.

April 30th Miss Yuille Smith, who stayed some time at Fawcett House with her son Bobbie, gave us a delightful piano recital in the Hall.

May 1st Saturday. After supper we made bags for the soldiers in hospital to keep their possessions in.

May 6th Miss Douglas told us of Lord Methuen’s appeal for books, games, &c., for the new base hospital at Malta.

May 7th Mr. Belloc gave us a second lecture. The subject was, “The War and the Political Situation in Europe.” (See special notice).

May 8th We heard that Ruth Wordsworth and her brother, who were passengers on the Lusitania, which was torpedoed on Friday, May 7th, were saved. In the evening we had a second War Work Party.

May 13th Ascension Day Service St. Martin’s at 8 a.m., and short service in School in the morning and evening. It was too wet to have a picnic, but it was a very happy festival all the same. We stayed in our Houses and did what we liked till 5 o’clock, when there was dancing in the Hall till 6.30.

May 20th Annual Service at St. Saviour’s. We sent a special offertory of £3, but, owing to the war, no representatives.

May 24th Empire Day. We had a short service at 12.20, and Miss Helen Bagnall gave a short address. (See special notice).

May 28th Miss Douglas read a letter of thanks from Lady Smith-Dorrien for the 150 holland bags sent, and said that 100,000 more were needed.

June 9th Service of Song at 8 o’clock, to which the Members of the League of Honour came.

June 10th Miss Douglas told us that Lady Hulse had consented to become a Governor of the School. The good news was received by a great clap.

June 11th Half Term. Those who did not go away stayed at St. Margaret’s with Miss Lucy.

Head Mistresses Conference, held this year at Walthamstow. Miss Douglas stated that some farmers had accepted her offer to let the School help in their hay fields.

June 16th The girls began to help with the hay, and continued to do so for several days, working in shifts.

June 21st Clarinda Allen got 3rd Class in the Historical Tripos, Part II., and in Natural ‘Science, Part I., Ivy Phillips got 3rd Class.

June 27th On Sunday afternoon Mrs. Creighton (widow of the late Bishop of London) very kindly came and spoke to the School at 5 o’clock.