Jottings From the School Diary – Christmas Term 1917


SATURDAY, JUNE 30TH – The March Playing Competition took place. Miss Westlake and Miss Awdry judged. There were 18 entries. E. Lea won the Competition.
MONDAY, JULY 9TH – The Local Schools Music Examination took place.
TUESDAY, JULY 10TH Miss Douglas told us at Prayers that C. Fletcher, M. Eppstein and H. Williams had passed “Responsions.”
MONDAY, JULY 16TH – A meeting was held to decide what funds the proceeds from the Sale should be given to. The result was that £500 was given to Queen Mary’s Needlework Guild, and £300 to the Red Cross.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 18TH – Mr. Schooling spoke to us on “Finance.” (See Special Notice.)
TUESDAY, JULY 24TH – The Musical Evening was held. After supper, instead of the end of term Dance, we went for 10 minutes strolls through the grounds.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 25TH – At 9.40 Miss Steer gave a very interest­ing lecture on “The War.” At 12 Miss Atkinson gave us a delightful Piano Recital.
THURSDAY, JULY 26TH – Mark Reading. Cloak Room Picture was won by Upper VA., and the Lower VA. and with 1 mark lost.
Form Room Cup was won by Special VI. and Lower IV. with no marks lost.
Finished Books-Upper VL was best with 82 per cent. Lower VI. being second with 80 per cent.
Reading Badges were won by the following leaving girls: Joan Eason, Penelope Newham, Dorothy Powney and Dorothy Turner.
The Tennis Cup was won by Sarum.
The 2nd Six Picture was won by Fawcett. The Championship was won by V. Leys.
Tennis brooches were won by M. Sim, G. Rigden and G. Taylor, Mrs. Leys wishes to give a picture next year to the House which keeps its courts marked best. Bad marks will be given for crooked lines, courts not marked out in time, and for want of care of the “corners.”
1st XI. Cricket Colours were won by J. Chapman, J. Hinxman, D. Turner, V. Greene and N. Northcroft.
The Cricket Cup was won by Fawcett House. The Running Cup was won by Y. Leys.
Red Girdles: Senior Girdles were won by M. Sim, S. Robertson, M. Thursby, G. Farnfield, L. Locke, P. Seal, J. Gunner, K. Gordon­ Duff, M. Waters, L. Taylor, and K. Beach. Junior by R. Aldworth.
The Red Girdle Form Cup was won by Upper VI. and Special VI, with 100 per cent. each.
The Junior Red Girdle Picture was won by Lower IV. with 42 per cent.
The Gardening Picture was won by Fawcett House.

Miss Douglas then spoke of the leaving Mistresses and Girls and wished them good-bye. She said she was not going to say much about Miss Parson. We all knew what a tremendous loss she was to her per­sonally, and what good and faithful work she had done for the School. She said how much Mrs. Pope would be missed by her House and spoke of the long time she had been with us. She gave her very best wishes to Miss Eastgate and Miss Waller and thanked them for all they had done to help us since they came to Oakhurst. She said how sorry we were to lose Miss E. Prosser and Miss Templeton, who had so kindly come to help us for a short time, and she gave her best wishes to Miss Fisher, who has worked so well with her Form and is now leaving to take up nursing. She then spoke of thee leaving Girls.
Y. Leys, who has been such an excellent leader as Head Girl. She came to the kindergarten when she was five years old and has been such a good and devoted member of Godolphin ever since. She is the first “grandchild ” of the school who was been Head Girl. Miss Douglas said how much Yvorne had been helped by her mother, herself a most devoted Old Girl of the school. She then asked for a special. clap for Yvorne, thanking her for her loyalty and helpfulness. Yvorne is going to St. Paul’s School to help with the games next term.
Miss Douglas then gave her very best wishes to the other girls who are leaving this term, D. Turner, D. Powney, P. Newham, E. Waters, M. Shorland, P. Turner, and N. C. Van der Meersch.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER, 26TH – School re-opened. After welcom­ing us back and hoping we had had jolly holidays, Miss Douglas told us of several alterations with regard to the Houses. Oakhurst has changed its name and will in future be known as Hamilton House. Lady Hulse has named it for us. We cannot have a Hulse House, because that name has been bestowed upon the house which Lady Hulse has presented to the City in memory of her son, so she chose Hamilton, as the Hamiltons are connected by marriage to her family. Miss Hartnell is the new housemistress there, with Miss Brownrigg to help her. The house is big enough now to stand alone for school com­petitions and “New Forest,” the name given to the three houses who combined, has disappeared. Mrs. Pope’s house” The Cedars” was given up when she left, and her girls with an additional six have taken up their abode under Mrs. Paulley’s charge at the house which was known as St. Martin’s Clergy House. This house has the honour of being named after our chairman, Lord Methuen, and is called Methuen House. They will join up with Glenside for games and House competitions and have already shown us that they intend to be a strong and keen House. Mrs. Paulley belongs by rights to St. Margaret’s, but they have had to give her up with a good grace to head a House of her own. The other big change, as to houses, has been the joining up of the two mistresses’ houses in Elm Grove which is now to be called Melbury. Miss Douglas then told us that Miss Buckle, who is an Old Girl, has come to teach History, Miss Alcock to teach English, and Madmoiselle Marchau, French. Miss Spencer has come to be Miss Douglas’s new Secretary in Miss Parson’s place.
Miss Douglas talked to us about determination and judgment. She told us what a great hunter, Dr. Gray, said, “I throw my heart over and my horse follows me.” When we want to accomplish anything we must put our whole hearts into it and aim high; we must have a high ideal of what our work and games at school should be, we must make a picture of it in our minds and then turn the picture into a reality.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29TH – We kept “Commem.” in a most delightful and inspiring way, though as long as the war lasts we know that there cannot be a real Commem. with the Old Girls flocking back to the old School. We all went to the celebration at St. Martin’s at a quarter to 8, and at 9.30 there was a service in School when we thought very specially of the Old Girls. At 5.50 we re-assembled at School and had a very exciting and interesting meeting in the Hall (see Special Notice.)

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15TH – Several girls went to an excellent Concert in the Town given by some Belgian artistes.
Miss E. Prosser very kindly sent the School a volume of Creighton’s “Queen Elizabeth,” for which we wish to thank her very heartily.
Lady Hulse has sent us a delightful edition of Haydn’s Dictionary of Dates. It has been decided to keep both these volumes in the VI. Form Reference Library.
At Break the School assembled and Mrs. Leys presented us with a beautiful silver cup for the Tennis Champion. She promises to give a miniature cup to any girl who wins the Championship three years running. The cup was then presented to Vera Leys, who won the Championship last term.
During October there was an Exhibition of Household Economy held in the Town. Batches of girls, under the charge of a mistress, went daily to see the Exhibition and also to hear some of the very interesting lectures on Cookery, Poultry Keeping and Gardening.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31st – The Schools’ Service was held at the Cathedral at 6. The Bishop of Kensington preached.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1st (All Saints’ Day) All who were able went to the Cathedral for evensong, and Miss Douglas had a service in the Hall for the others at School at 8.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th – A party of girls and the Head Mistress from Bruton came to see the School. They were shown every­thing by Upper VI, who were excused the first lesson after break.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14TH – The School went to a delightful concert in the Town given by Miss M. V. White, Miss S. Eaton and Boris Lensky. (See Special Notice).

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24TH – A party of about 84 wounded soldiers from the Red Cross and the Infirmary came to a concert and tea. (See Special Notice).

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27TH – Miss Douglas read us a letter at Prayers from the 2nd Southern General Hospital to thank for two pairs of crutches made by us, and to say they would be glad of as many more as we can possibly make.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29TH – Miss Douglas’ birthday. She had to spend mast of it in London to attend a meeting of Head Masters and Mistresses called by Sir Arthur Yapp, the Food Controller, to discuss the question of feeding in the Schools.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1ST – Serbian exhibition and lecture. (See Special Notice).

MONDAY, DECEMBER 3RD – House Marching Competition judged by the Sherborne drill mistress.
Nelson House won the cup.
In the evening a lecture by Dr. Lloyd on Canada. (See Special Notice.)

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5TH – In the evening the Assistant ­Chaplain-General of the Forces (Rev. F. G. Tuckey) gave an address (see Special Notice) to the School, at which members of the League of Honour were also present.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7TH – The annual speech day of the Godolphin School was held, when the certificates gained during the year were distributed to the, successful scholars by Sir Henry Newbolt. The gathering was attended by a large number of parents and friends. Canon Morrice presided, and was supported on the platform by the Hon. Lady Hulse, Miss Style, Miss Hussey, Sir Henry Newbolt, the Mayor (Mr. J. Macklin), Archdeacon Dundas, Canon Myers, Mr. J. M. Swayne, and the Headmistress (Miss Douglas).

At the outset, Miss Douglas said they had looked forward with a great deal of pleasure to seeing Lady Newbolt present to distribute the certificates, but she had just received a letter from her stating that her father had died, and therefore she was unable to be present. It was extremely kind of Sir Henry Newbolt to have attended, and she asked him to convey their deep sympathy to Lady Newbolt in her bereave­ment. Miss Douglas then asked the permission of the Governors of the School to send a cable to their Chairman, their own Field-Marshal, Lord Methuen, who was in Malta. conveying to him greetings from that gathering and good wishes in his great work there. (Ap­plause.)

Miss Douglas presented her report for the year. (Extracts from the Report):

The Health of the School – It is with great thankfulness that I am able to tell you that the health of the school has been very good. There were several cases of German measles earlier in the year, and a few cases of chicken-pox, but the Sanatorium has not been opened once this term, and during the past eight months has only been required for two cases of chicken pox.

The Number of Girls in the School – The school has been quite full all the year, with an average number of 215 girls. This term there are 218 – 144 being Boarders; and 74 Sarum House. There is a long waiting list.

The Regular Work of the School – It is no wonder in these stirring times that I am able to report that the school is shewing on the whole an increasing spirit of earnestness in work, and a greater inter st in trying to discover in what direction each one may best be able to be of service when school days are over. The weak places in our ranks which show a lack of thoroughness and perseverance are, I feel sure, not going to remain weak if the air around them is strong and bracing. The girls take no public examination until they reach the Lower VIth Form, at the age of 16 or 17, so that the work all the way up the school till then has a really good chance of being enjoyed for its own sake. At the same time, it is being done with a thoroughness on the part of teachers and girls that should make the examination test no great terror when it has to be undergone. I think my dislike of examinations in themselves is thoroughly well-known, and my work as a member of Examination Committees in London is always on the side of giving candidates a choice of subjects, and against what I believe is the fetish of making any subject compulsory, except perhaps the mother tongue. But as Ion- as examinations are there as the entrance gate to further education, training, or useful work in any field, we must just take them without making any needless fuss about them. We try to get them done in the Lower VIth, and then the last year at school feels delightfully free for working in any way that best suits the in­dividual. If a scholarship at a University is in view then that shapes the work for that particular girl, but scholarship work is highly in­teresting, and is sure to be in subjects for which there is natural inclination and aptitude. I will presently read the examination results, only saying now that all who took the Senior Cambridge Examination passed in every subject and gained the exemptions from other examinations which they were trying for. Besides the time-table work of the school, many other things take place which are particularly interesting, and certainly of educational value, such as the reading aloud competition for the reading badge, the house sinning compe­tition, the English literary Society, the French society, not to speak of the extraordinary value of the training, and the very great enjoyment of the games. All these things have been active during the past year. Since my last report we have had the following lectures and addresses, Mr. Shaw McLaren on the wonderful work of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals; Mr. Bedford Pym on National Flags; Miss Gray, the Headmistress of St. Paul’s Girls’ School, on teaching as a national service; Mr. Schooling on true patriotism; Miss Radford on the work of the Serbian refugees in Corsica, where she has been for eighteen months; Dr. Lloyd on Canada; and a very stirring address from the Assistant Chaplain-General to the Forces.

I must now speak of a new boarding-house which has been opened this term, as Mrs. Pope, who had been with us so many years, gave up her house to fill the important post of lady-superintendent of the Diocesan Training College of Fishponds, Bristol. Her girls at the Cedars were very sorry to lose her, but, have shown their loyalty to her good training by throwing themselves heart and soul into giving the new house a good start. Another thing that has helped to inspire this new house with the right feeling was the permission by cable from our own particular Field-Marshal, Governor of Malta, to call it Methuen House. So, there it is, a very happy house, with Mrs. Paulley in charge whilst her husband is abroad with the Forces, and Miss Chawner to help her. Another house must be specially mentioned. Miss Eastgate left us at the end of last term to join the W.A.A.C. after being the head of Oakhurst, and also giving delightful lessons in English literature in the school. Miss Waller, her helper at Oakhurst, left us at the same time, and is a House Mistress at Birkhamstead. Their places have been taken by Miss Hartnell, who has given up her im­portant post on the Staff of the Lincoln High School) to come and be the head of what was Oakhurst, and also to teach literature here. She is helped by an old friend of mine, Miss Brownrigg who has done such valuable work for children in South London. The name of the house has been changed from Oakhurst, which had no particular significance for us, and has been re-christened by Lady Hulse with the name of Hamilton House. We should have liked to call it Hulse House, but that name already belongs to the house given by Lady Hulse to social work in the city. She, therefore, chose Hamilton House, as being the name, which connects the Hulse family with Salisbury. She already speaks of it as her house, so we know what to expect of it! There are now seven houses, School House, founded by the will of Elizabeth Godolphin, who looks down upon us from that wall. Her will as to founding this school is engraven in stone in the cloisters of Westminster Abbey. Some hundred years later Sarum House came into being, or in other words, day girls were added to the little party of boarders. Between the years 1895 and 1917 St. Margaret’s, Nelson House, Fawcett House, Hamilton House, and Methuen House have been added to the school. The greater the number of Houses, the more important does it become that the larger School spirit shall mingle with and dominate the House spirit, to the avoidance of anything in the nature of clique or an unworthy kind of rivalry, and I am thank­ful to say that all the leading girls are at one with the Heads of the Houses and myself in this matter. Strong friendships are being made between girls belonging to different Houses and to give and take in work and games is heartily enjoined as part of the very salt of school life.
Yet another House must be mentioned, and that is the Mistresses’ House called Melbury, in Elm Grove-road. Two convenient houses have been thrown together this term and there 13 of the regular staff live, and Mrs. Bacchus has gone very near to accomplishing the im­possible by the masterly way in which she has secured their comfort at this time when housekeeping is so difficult.

The following is a list of awards:­

Mary Gordon, who obtained a First in Greats at Oxford, has now gained the certificate of merit in letters, B. Litt. for a thesis on Greek oligarchies; Kathleen Connah, R.C.M. Council’s Exhibition for Piano (£8), R.C.M. Pauer Memorial Exhibition for Piano (£7 10s.), and R.C.M. Director’s Prize for Elocution. Marv Tracey, London University Matriculation; Honor Williams, Oxford Responsions; Monica Savory, Oxford Responsions.


(July) Oxford Responsions (Latin, Greek and Algebra), Cynthia Fletcher, Mary Eppstein. Oxford and Cambridge Joint Board: Higher Certificate, M. Ainslie, French, Botany History, English; M. Sinclair, French, Botany (completing certificate).

Senior Cambridge Local Examination. Eleven candidates took this examination, and all passed in every subject. Eight passed in all the subjects necessary to obtain exemption from the London Matriculation Examination. 2nd Class Honours, K. M. Hirst, English Essay and Literature, English History, Latin, French, Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. 3rd Class Honours, M. M. Dalston, English Essay and Literature (v.g.), English History, Latin, French (distinguished), Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. 3rd Class Honours, S. G. Lister, English Essay and Literature, English History, Latin, French, Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. Pass, N. M. Blackett, English Essay (v.g.) and Literature, English History, French, Arith­metic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. Pass, S. T. Wotton, English Essay and Literature (v.g.) English History, Latin, French, Arith­metic, Geometry, Algebra. Pass, S. A. Clive-Smith, English Essay and Literature (dist.), English History, French, Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. Pass, D. M. Turner, English Essay and Literature, Latin, French, Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. Pass, J. R. Chapman, English Essay and Literature, English History, Latin, French, Arithmetic (v.g.), Geometry, Algebra. Pass, V. M. M. Greene, English Essay and Literature (v.g.), English History (distinguished), French, Arithemetic, Botany. Pass, C. Mackworth, English Essay (v.(Y.) and Literature, English History, French, Arithmetic, Botany, Drawing. Pass, Y. S. Leys, English Essay and Literature, English History, French, Arithmetic, Botany.

Music – Local Centre of Associated Board (R.A.M. and R.C.M.) Ivy Moon has passed the Piano Higher Division of the Schools’ Examination of the Associated Board (Miss Coombs’ pupil). Advanced Grade. Violin, Joyce Carter (Miss N. Harding’s pupil); Intermediate. Violin, G. Bacchus (Miss Ward’s pupil).

Local Schools (R.A.M. and R.C.M.) Examiner, Mr. 1TcEwan. Violin Higher, Helen Livesey and Eileen Douglas. Violin Higher, Kathleen Sargeaunt and Mavis Leys; Cello Lower, Vera Leys; Piano Higher, Mary Rose, Muriel Harris and Mavis Leys; Piano Lower, Evelyn Birney, and Barbara Mules; Piano Primary, Kitty Earle.

Miss Fanny Davies. Prize N. Figgis. Awards of Merit, Mary Dalston, Helen Theodosius, Lilly Shannon, Margaret Chilton, and Marjory Glynn. Highly commended, Felicite Monier-Williams, Mavis Leys. Commended, Hilda Elworthy, Phyllis Clarke and Wenonah Wood.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10TH – Miss F. Davies’ Concert. (See Special Notice.)
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11TH – We heard that Jerusalem had been taken by the British Forces. Miss Douglas told us at prayers, and we gave thanks that after all these centuries the Holy City is now in the hands of a Christian Nation.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12TH – Mark Reading in the afternoon. The various Challenge Cups were presented, and Miss F. Davies prize was won this year by Betty Buxton. Awards of merit gained by Mar­garet Walker, Lit Taylor, Cath Harrison, Lettice Jenkins, M. Dalston. Highly Commended, F. Monier-Williams, C. Coombs. Commended, Ivy Moon.
Tidy Marks -Form Room Cup. No marks lost by Up. VI., Up. Sp. VI., Low. VI., Low. Sp. VI., Low. V.B., Low. IV., Cloak Room picture won by Up. Sp. VI.
Sight Reading Music Competition – Hamilton House top.
Gardening poem cup won by M. Blackett; gardening picture won by School House; red girdle picture, Lower School, won by Lower IV.; red girdle cup, Upper School, won by Up. VI. and Up. V.
Reading Competition. School House top.

Miss Douglas said a few words to the girls about their journeys and how they were to be as helpful and steady as possible, giving no unnecessary trouble to the railway officials in these difficult times. She then told them to try and have very happy holidays by making other people happy. She then wished good-bye to those leaving: ­
Matron, who has been such a tremendous help to everybody and will not only be missed very much indeed by School House but by the whole school.
Miss Maunsell, who has given such capital help since she has been with us, must have a little share in the big clap for Matron. She then gave her very best wishes to all the girls leaving this term, M. Blackett and K. Hirst from Hamilton House; M. Sini, L. Plunkett, L. Box, B. Fagge, from Fawcett House; M. Newson and M. Constable, Sarum House; M. Howes, from St. Margaret’s; and K. Earle, from Nelson House. Miss Douglas finished by reminding us of the different ad­dresses we had had the great privilege of hearing this term, speaking so forcibly again and again of the influence of women and girls, and she reminded us that it always matters much more what we are than what we do. It is character which tells, and it is now, during school days, we must form our characters if we want to be capable of exercising that tremendous influence for good which our country expects of us.


Games – Summer 1916

SPRING TERM – LACROSSE – The House Tournament resulted in a draw. Nelson and Fawcett both scored 21 goals, which was considerably higher than any other House. They share the Cup.

February 12th – St. Margaret’s beat New Forest by 5 goals to 4.
Nelson beat School House by 10 goals to 1.
February 19th – St. Margaret’s beat Sarum by 3 goals to 1.
Nelson and Fawcett drew 4 goals all.
February 22nd – Nelson and Fawcett drew 1 goal all.
March 14th – Fawcett beat Nelson by 4 goals to 3.
All three matches were very even, and both teams deserved to win.
March 17th – Fawcett beat St. Margaret’s by 6 goals to nil.

May 27th – Nelson beat School by 26 runs.
New Forest beat Sarum by 32 runs.
Fawcett beat St. Margaret’s by 51 runs,
June 10th – St. Margaret’s beat New Forest by 81 runs.
School beat Fawcett by 2 wickets and 32 runs.
Nelson beat Sarum by 117 runs.


LAWN TENNIS – The results of the Lawn Tennis will be in the Autumn


Roll of Honour – Christmas 1915

Douglas Robb, Major Hugh Forster, King’s Own Scottish Borderers. John Harold Clark, Lawrence Jowett, Acland Douglas Thomson.

N.B. Olga Thompson, nee Baillee Grohman (Fawcett House, 1904-1906), writes to ask us to let her friends know through the School Magazine, as she is unable to write to many of them, that her husband fell fighting bravely across the border of German East Africa. He was Wounded in his right arm, refused to retire, and went on fighting with his left arm only until he fell with a bullet through his head, on March 9th, 1915.

Commem October 1915 – Christmas 1915

On Friday morning, October 1st, at Prayers Miss Douglas gave out the following notice: “I’m glad to say that we may expect about fifty soldiers from the Infirmary and Red Cross Hospital to tea to-morrow, and the whole School is invited to the entertainment afterwards.” (This then, was how we were to spend Commem. this year!) “Will the Houses prepare for the Party as follows:

School House will lay the tables in the School House dining room, clear away and wash up afterwards.

St. Margaret’s will decorate the tables.

New Forest will decorate the Hall and cut up bread and butter.

Fawcett House will arrange where the boarders sit in the gallery.

Nelson will cut up the cakes.

The Senior girls of Sarum House will be stewards in the Hall.”

All this was excellently carried through.

About 3.45 when all was ready our guests began to arrive, and were all at tea by 4 o’clock. Most of them were from the Dardanelles, and had much to tell us of their experiences. They were full of thankfulness that it fell to their lot to be sent to England.

The Entertainment began about 4.45, and who would have thought that Commem. 1915 would be a smoking concert! However, Mrs. Elizabeth Godolphin looked down as complacently as ever, and we may be sure gave her blessing on our small effort to bring cheer and relaxation to our brave soldiers.

After lively strains from the Orchestra-songs sung by Mrs. Leys, a choir of girls, and choruses sung by us all, we had The National anthem, our Commem. hymn, “Now thank we all our God,” and cheers for all our gallant fighters. On this occasion the loudest cheer was for the Army.

Just to remind us of a former Commem. the light went out, and the Orchestra finished its performance by the aid of candles held by girls, which possibly added to the amusement of the men, though it was inconsiderate of the light to choose that day!

We enjoyed our Commem., and while spending it in this unique way our thoughts continually went out to all of you Old Girls in your work, and to those of you who are sad.


School News – Summer Term 1915


March 8th Mr. Marston, a blind clergyman, came to us and spoke about his work.

March 9th School Service taken by the Rev. H. Marston, who gave an address on Prayer.

March 11th Mr. Belloc’s Lecture. (See last issue.)

March 16th School Service taken by the Rev. A. G. Robertson, who spoke about “excuses.”

Governors’ Meeting.

March 24th School Service taken by Canon Sowter.

March 29th Mark Reading. This was one day earlier than the day fixed owing, to an outbreak of German measles.

Miss Douglas first read the results of the various competitions:

Cloak Room Picture, won by III; three marks lost.

Form Tidy Cup, won by Low. V., Sp. VB and II., who all lost no marks.

Finished Books, Top Up. VI., 78.81 per cent.

Red Girdles. Junior Girdles were given for the first time :¬

Senior: M. Thomas, O. Batchelor, J. Adams, D. Ashford, M. Chilton, P. Clarke, M. Ainslie, S. Lister, N. Richards, E. Hudson, K. Newson, P. Pinneger, V. Coles, and M. Wood.

Junior: M. Allan, M Leys, V. Arnold, G. Coles, M. Rose, M. Du Buisson, and M. Osmond.

La Crosse Pins: S. Yorke, B. Bridge, M. Holmes, H. Elworthy, FT. Elam, M. Godley, and D. Harvey-Jones. Those leaving were :

Special VI., E. Lock, prefect of Fawcett House.

Stanford, St. Margaret’s.

Lower V., M. Chalmers, Fawcett House.

Special VB., Violet Coles, Sarum House.

Lower IV., D. Chalmers, Fawcett House.

II, G. Smyth, Sarum House.

In saying ‘good-bye to those leaving, Miss Douglas said that she hoped that they would remember that the only way to be really happy was by serving others, and that they would stamp their lives with the word “service.” She also said that she hoped that those who were going home would continue there the things they had begun at school. Miss Douglas said she would not say much to the school, as she had had many talks during the term. She hoped all would listen to the lessons of which the holidays would be full-Confirmation for some, Good Friday and Easter, and the message of renewed hope which comes with spring.

March 31st The Confirmation Day. Owing to some of the candidates having had German measles, it was arranged that they should be confirmed separately at St. Mark’s Church by Bishop Joscelyne, at the same hour as the service held in the Cathedral. A few days before Finetta Bathurst was confirmed in Exeter Cathedral, as she had had to go home owing to whooping cough. The following is the full list of the girls who were confirmed this term: C. Mackworth, M. Ainslie, J. Dewe, J. Eason, I. Pears, J. Pears, H. de Behr, P. Blunt, G. Rigden, M. Osmond, M. Hardy, D. Turner, M. Constable, H. Livesey, M. Glynn, P. Clarke, M. Eppstein, P. Godwin, P. Seal, N. Northcroft, K. Sargeaunt, S. Wotton, M. Wood, M. Vines, P. Du Buisson, K. Newson, F. Bathurst.


April 25th School re-opened on St. George’s Day. The flag was flown, and we sang the hymn, “The Son of God goes forth to War,” and the collect for S. Michael and All Angels was read.

Miss Douglas then read the results of the Associated Board of the R.A.M. and R.C.M., Local Centre, April, 1915.

We were very glad to hear that Canon Sowter was to be a Governor of the School, and clapped heartily.

New Prefect. Fawcett House, M Stevens-Guille.

Miss Douglas read the written rules, and reminded us that there are besides many unwritten rules, which are very important. Their observance comes naturally to those who have the right spirit.

Miss Douglas then spoke a little about the life of St. George and what he stands for. He is the champion of Right fighting for the Cross and prevailing against the Dragon, the type of all that is base, cruel, and deceitful. St. George was taken to be the Patron Saint of England by Edward III., and therefore all English men and women are bound to fight with determination under his banner against all manner of evil.

In the Wiltshire Arts and Crafts Exhibition of April, 1915, B. Niven gained a 1st class certificate for drawing from the round, and R. Ainslie a 1st class certificate for pencil drawing from life. A sheet of brushwork by various girls was also granted a 1st class certificate. A Foljambe’s work was commended.

April 26th Our new Governor, Canon Sowter, brought the Archbishop of Armagh to speak to us. The Archbishop expressed his doubts at being able to talk to girls until he was told to speak as he would to boys. He then told us to remember that the honour of a school depends on its individual members, and he also spoke of the important place of friendship in life, and quoted a boy’s definition of a friend, “One who knows you well and likes you still.”

April 27th Miss Douglas and the Staff went to meet the Archbishop at the Training College, by the invitation of Canon and Mrs. Sowter and Miss Forth, the Principal.

April 28th In the evening the Rev. Denis Victor, of the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa, and the Principal of St. Michael’s College, Likoma, for training native students who become teachers, came and spoke to us about his work.

April 30th Miss Yuille Smith, who stayed some time at Fawcett House with her son Bobbie, gave us a delightful piano recital in the Hall.

May 1st Saturday. After supper we made bags for the soldiers in hospital to keep their possessions in.

May 6th Miss Douglas told us of Lord Methuen’s appeal for books, games, &c., for the new base hospital at Malta.

May 7th Mr. Belloc gave us a second lecture. The subject was, “The War and the Political Situation in Europe.” (See special notice).

May 8th We heard that Ruth Wordsworth and her brother, who were passengers on the Lusitania, which was torpedoed on Friday, May 7th, were saved. In the evening we had a second War Work Party.

May 13th Ascension Day Service St. Martin’s at 8 a.m., and short service in School in the morning and evening. It was too wet to have a picnic, but it was a very happy festival all the same. We stayed in our Houses and did what we liked till 5 o’clock, when there was dancing in the Hall till 6.30.

May 20th Annual Service at St. Saviour’s. We sent a special offertory of £3, but, owing to the war, no representatives.

May 24th Empire Day. We had a short service at 12.20, and Miss Helen Bagnall gave a short address. (See special notice).

May 28th Miss Douglas read a letter of thanks from Lady Smith-Dorrien for the 150 holland bags sent, and said that 100,000 more were needed.

June 9th Service of Song at 8 o’clock, to which the Members of the League of Honour came.

June 10th Miss Douglas told us that Lady Hulse had consented to become a Governor of the School. The good news was received by a great clap.

June 11th Half Term. Those who did not go away stayed at St. Margaret’s with Miss Lucy.

Head Mistresses Conference, held this year at Walthamstow. Miss Douglas stated that some farmers had accepted her offer to let the School help in their hay fields.

June 16th The girls began to help with the hay, and continued to do so for several days, working in shifts.

June 21st Clarinda Allen got 3rd Class in the Historical Tripos, Part II., and in Natural ‘Science, Part I., Ivy Phillips got 3rd Class.

June 27th On Sunday afternoon Mrs. Creighton (widow of the late Bishop of London) very kindly came and spoke to the School at 5 o’clock.

Sarum House Old Girls

Spring Term 1915

More help is wanted in the Red Cross Hospital Kitchen. Kitchenmaids and Charge Cooks are wanted. Hours 9a.m. till 3p.m., or, 3pm, till 8.30 p.m. Please write to Mrs. Bardsley, The Close, or to Miss Wyld, Fawcett House, stating definite days and hours you can work. Help offered must be regular. This is important.

A Visit to the Belgian Refugees

Autumn Term 1914

On Tuesday, 27th October, Miss Wyld took me up to London. We went up to the Belgian Refugee Transport Office, where we found Miss May Wyld, who told us that just as she was about to leave the Office on Monday night, between 11 and 12 o’clock, she had a telephone message to say that 2000 refugees would arrive at about one o’clock that night, and that they must be met and sent somewhere for the night. They were all sent to Alexandra Palace; Miss May Wyld took some up in her car. She told us that they none of them spoke at all, but allowed themselves to be ordered about like small children, which is not surprising, as they were some of those who had been saved from the Gantaume, and also some others fleeing from their country, who were half starved and so dazed and tired that they were grateful for any food and shelter.

First we went to a big hall near the Office, where most of the better class of those saved from the Gantaume had been sent. Miss May Wyld said that it was very difficult to tell the difference between the better and the poorer classes, as they all looked more less like tramps after their long journey, with no clothes except the ones they had on.

The we went to the Alexandra Palace. We took a parcel of sweets from Fawcett House for the Belgian children. When we got there we saw crowds of men, women, and children, wandering about or sitting in groups, with nothing to do. We also saw two huge halls absolutely crowded with beds; they were packed in as tightly as they could be. One room was for the men, the other for the women. The children must have slept several to a bed. Then we saw another hall, which was lined with tables. We saw one table which was stacked with bread.

Some of the poor people had to stay at the Alexandra Palace for about a week, others for only a few days. It depended on how soon homes could be found for them all over England.

Miss May Wyld drove us back through London, and it looked so strange that all the streets were so dark; even the car’s lights had brown paper pasted over them, so as not to show up the streets so clearly.

Margaret Chalmers, Lower V.