News of Old Mistresses and Girls – Christmas Term 1917

Monica Savory tells us that she passed Responsions in July, so hopes to go to St. Hugh’s next October. She is now working at the Warwick Record Office. She says: “A great deal of the work has to do with the casualties, and in one section they send out the notice to the next ­of kin when the men are killed or wounded. We get in all the documents belonging to the men, their attestations, medical histories, wills, &c., and we keep a record of all their military service, wounds, medals, campaigns, and all particulars about their families.”

Dorothy Lowe, writing about the usual date for Commem, says “I feel to-day we ought all to be travelling Salisbury roads,” She had had a lovely week-end with Joe Hensley, and had run up against Naomi Peak and had also come across May Dickinson at the massage examinations. She has got her first massage post at Cambridge in the 1st Eastern General Hospital, 24 big wards all huts. She says her brother was near Arras with a search light.

Eva Tatham is still a Clerk in the 4th Southern General Hospital at Plymouth. Her uncle has been made a Brigadier-General and head of all Naval and Marine Recruiting at the Admiralty. She says she was given 24 hours’ leave, so was able to be bridesmaid to Phillipa Murray (nee Kitchener). Phillipa’s husband is in the R.F.C. and in Palestine.

Mary Gordon, obtained the Certificate of Merit in Letters (equivalent to the B. Litt.) for her thesis on Greek Oligarchies at Oxford. She says “My Oxford life seems quite far away now after a term in Man­chester. I am very happy indeed here, and like the school and the girls and my work and my colleagues very much.”

Dorothy Kent writes from Durham. She says she and Joan Shorto meet and talk Godolphin. Her brother, who has had to be put into C3 Class owing to a bad knee, is now in the High Commissioner’s Office in London. She gives an interesting account of the soldiers’ huts in Durham, and says how busy every body is preparing eggs, salads, vegetables, fruit, sandwiches, cake, tea, coffee, and cocoa.

Isabel Rennie is working in the laundry of the Hospital at Sidmouth, and says the laundry work she learnt in LoweriV. has come in very useful.

Chrissy Leslie-Jones (nee Baskett) is leaving her home in Lahore, as the following notice will explain. We congratulate her upon her husband’s appointment to the Principalship of the Mayo College: ­”Your readers have already learnt of the appointment of Mr. F. A. Leslie-Jones to the Principalship of the Mayo College, Ajmer, and Mrs. and Mr. Leslie-Jones’ consequent departure from Lahore, where they have resided for thirteen years. It is difficult to think of a change which could occasion more widespread regret in the Province. As head of the institution through which the scions of the leading Indian families pass on their way to manhood. Mr. Leslie-Jones has, of course, played a very important role in the political life of the Punjab, and his loss will be a very real one to Indians. The active part moreover which lie and his wife have taken in promoting sport among the European community in the Capital, and their untiring support of all social in­stitutions and undertakings have been so very marked that their places will be very difficult to fill. A cricket week without ‘L.J.’ and a Punjab tennis tournament without Mrs. Leslie-Jones will be hard to imagine. Still Ajmer is not so very far away, and we may see something of them occasionally.”

Ruth Strange is nursing at The Anglo-Russia Hospital, Petrograd, Stephanie Strange is about to commence work with the motor trans­port, the small V.A.D. Hospital where they were previously working being temporarily closed.

P. Turner sends an interesting account of her first term at St. Paul’s School. She has gone into the VI. 3 Form and likes her work very much. If she gets her remove next year she is expected to take the Senior Cambridge. She says she has spoken to Miss Ash, she also says “I am getting up a little party which we call the Godolphin Re-union. We are asking as many Old Godolphinites as we can collect to lunch and tea on November 18th. Yvorne Leys is helping us. There is Miss Hymans de Tiel and Dacre Alexander and Eva Bartruni, from the Medical School, and Jean Chapman and Phyllis Clark live quite near us. I am so looking forward to it.”

Gladys Scott says: “This is just a very short letter to tell you that I am going to Paris next seek to be secretary to a great friend of my chief (who is still in India). He is running the Y.M.C.A. for the American troops. I think the work should be very interesting, and he writes that there is plenty of it!”

Nancy Humphries is nursing in the Royal Naval Hospital, Truro. She has been there since the Hospital opened nearly two years ago and likes it very much. Olive Prater cooks at a Red Cross Hospital in Budleigh Salterton.

Phyllis Codwin is learning how to drive an ambulance. She hopes to drive the wounded straight from Southampton to hospitals in Winchester.

Kathleen Sargeaunt is getting on splendidly with her cooking and housecraft at Malvern.
Lilly Shannon is living in London and preparing for a secretary’s post.
Nancy Northcroft is going on with her music and helping at home.

Katharine Hulbert is among the Wiltshire nurses whose names have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War for valu­e able services rendered in connection with the war.

S. Yorke is working for a degree in Agriculture at St. Andrew’s Hall, Reading, and she much enjoys the training.

J. Hinxman is busy helping at home, where she takes some of the lessons in the morning and works at a Red Cross Hospital in the after­noons.

M. Holmes is orderly at Longford Castle Hospital.
C. Preece is nursing in the officers’ ward at Queen Mary’s Hospital for Women in London.
L. Poynton packs for the A.O.D. voluntary workers at Didcot near her home, and meets Ursula Armitage at the same work.

Lucy Seton, having had previous training, went as V.A.D. to Drum­tochty Castle, Kincardineshire, when war broke out, it being lent as a V.A.D. Hospital. When it closed a year afterwards, she came to Edinburgh, and worked in a private nursing home for some months. From Edinburgh she went to the hospital at Balham and was there till August, 1916, and then proceeded to St. Paul’s Hospital at Malta. She remained there till it was re-organised as the 63rd General Hospital and sent to Salonika. She re-engaged with it and accompanied it to Salonika, where she now is, for, at any rate, a further period of six months.

Constance Wollastan, after doing various odd war jobs, was trained as a policewoman, and was sent to Gretna Munition Factory, and thence to Carlisle. She was promoted Sergeant, June, 1917. She was moved shortly afterwards to East Riggs, Dumfriesshire. She was obliged to resign at the end of September as she was ill, but after a period of rest and convalescence with friends in Scotland, she was appointed Assistant Welfare Superintendent at Elswick Works, Newcastle-on­Tyne, at the end of October, 1917.

Margaret Fawcett, who has been in Russia with the Scottish Women’s Hospital Unit. has received a medal, and we send her through the maga­zine our heartiest congratulations. In writing to her mother she says “We had a visit before nine o’clock this morning from Prince Dolgo­roudoff and several Generals and we were all given medals ; they are silver with orange and black ribbon.”

We also congratulate May Wyld (Florence Maria Wyld), Member of; the Order of the British Empire. For work in the Secunderabad Hospitals for sick and wounded from Mesopotamia.

Ena de Jersey sends a, very interesting account from Guildford of her work in a hostel for National Service Girls working. on the land. She says “This hostel started on June 14th as a training centre, but now that the colder weather has set in it is more of a depot where they come whilst waiting for places. My friend, Miss Perrean, is the superintendent and I am her A.D.C.; in other words. I am the house parlormaid, general bottle washer, and her secretary into the bargain. I simply love the life, though it is pretty hard work. There is no time to be bored with its monotony, as we live in a perpetual state of never knowing what is going to happen next. On the whole we have some very nice girls. They are mostly drawn from the servant class, they wear the breeches and overalls and are called by their surnames. The day’s work is as follows: Getting up bell at 6 a.m., breakfast at 6.45, then one girl stays at home each day to help in the house, which has to be done from top to bottom every day, the girls have to be on the farms at 8 a.m., and they take their lunches with them; they knock off work at 5 p.m., and come home for a big meal at 6 o’clock, known as tea, though they have meat and pudding and cups of tea.”

May Bailey writes: “At present, I am working at the County Second­ary School, Wolverton, Bucks, as an assistant mistress. I have full charge of the domestic work, which includes cookery, housewifery, laundry and needlework. For this work I have a special building adjoining the school, which is quite new. This work was not done in the school previous to my appointment. As all forms (I.-VI.) take domestic work, most of my time is occupied with it. The Food Control Committee for this district arranged for war lectures on economy in food to be given in this neighbourhood and district. These lectures they kindly invited me to give, I have just completed them, three a week for the last seven weeks.

A. Currey is working hard with Girl Guides in Capetown.
W. Harvey-Jones is also doing excellent work with Girl Guides at Bexhill.
P. Riddle has gone to Miss Jones at Grahamstown to teach mathematics in her school.
B. Knowles is housemaid in a hospital at Harpenden
S. and H. Toms go alternate months to the officers’ hospital at Watermouth Castle. ‘
E. Charlton (Brown) is living in Maida Vale, her husband is in hospital in London.
D. Wilson is driving the Salisbury Red Cross Ambulance.
Miss Ashford has gone for six months to a military hospital in Norfolk.

Miss Fairclough has been moved to Alexandria and is taking charge of the invalid kitchen at the 78th General Hospital. It is a Convalescent Hospital, and she starts her day by making 47 pints of “Benger.” All milk having to be boiled on paraffin New Perfection stoves, and she only has six burners!

M Saunders, Irene Morrice and H. C. Livesay are kitchen maids at the Salisbury Red Cross Hospital.

A. Hubbock (Parish) is living in Glasgow and helping in the War Depot.
L. Delacombe is still working at munitions at “Park Royal.” Her particular work is overlooking the girls who are making cartridges.
D. Moore is working at the Art School in Edinburgh.
Enid Carter has gone to Paris to be with her father for six months.
Miss Luce and Miss Williamson are both teaching at the “Ladies’ College” in Jersey.

Miss Ralph is to be house mistress of a new boarding house at Miss Jones’ School in Grahamstown.
M. Knowles goes to the Y.M.C.A. canteens at week-ends and also works at a War Depot at Harpenden.

Janet Dennison is working as Quartermaster’s Orderly at Christ­church V.A.D. Hospital, and loves the work.

Helen Theodosius is studying the Froebel system of teaching in order to take up kindergarten work. She is also hoping to continue her music with Miss Fanny Davies, but at present is not allowed to use one of her wrists for playing.

Madge Glynn is studying shorthand and typewriting to fit herself for secretarial work.

Rosamond Burne (Wolley-Dodd) sends a jolly photograph of her little girl aged 16 months, and has a wee son too now. She says Marjorie is nursing in Cheshire, and Nancy is a V.A.D. in France.

K. Lewis tells of her jolly family of boys all enjoying their life on the farm at Bentley and helping to cut up between 16 and 30 bushels of swedes a day. Her husband has got the D.S.O. and was twice mentioned in despatches last year. We heartily congratulate her and him.

Vera Morrison is working every day on a farm, milking and butter making; and poultry, taking a man’s place, and her baby is all the better for living in the country. Her address is Elmbrook, Clear Down, Woking.
Ivy Hutchins is nursing at Chatham.
Norah Montgomery is very busy at canteen work, clerk’s cafe, and packing parcels for prisoners.

Quite a large company of Godolphinites are at the School of Medicine: Miss Hynams de Tiel, Merell Middlemore, Dacre Alexander, Eva Bartram, Dolly Turner.

Miss Wyld and Mrs. Everett “We said good-bye as usual to Miss Wyld before the Christmas holidays, and we were destined never to see her again. The loss, however, was compensated for by the punctual arrival of Mrs. Everett at the beginning of the term. We celebrated the exchange on the first, morning of the term by a prolonged and hearty clap for (xciwra1 and i1lrs. Everett, and again through the pages of the magazine we want to convey to them our very heartiest best wishes. General Everett has gone back to Salonika after his short leave, and Fawcett House has been able to welcome Mrs. Everett back for a time.

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School News – Christmas 1916

SUMMER TERM, 1916.

Monday, July 10th – We heard that Margaret Stevens-Guille had passed Responsions, and that Jessie Flemming had gained a 1st in History at Oxford.
Miss Douglas proposed that we, as a School, should join the War Savings Association (see special notice).
Monday, July 17th, was the date of the first performance of the Pageant of Empire for the League of Honour and a few other friends, July 18th and 19th for all who paid one shilling, and on Tuesday afternoon for wounded soldiers from both hospitals in Salisbury. The proceeds on the two “paying nights” amounted to 28l. 11s. 5d. for the Star and Garter Home for totally disabled soldiers and sailors.
July 24th. The School Concert took place.
July 25th. The March Playing Tournament was held. Seventeen girls entered, and Lilian King was the best. – Miss Westlake and Miss Gillian judged.
In the morning Miss Mixer’s classes gave a very delightful Rhythm Exhibition, to which several parents came.
Wednesday, July 26th. Mark Reading.
Miss Douglas told us that Yvonne Leys is to be head of the School. The names of some of the Forms have been altered. Rules containing some differences in the clothes’ list were read.
Cloak Room Marks. Sp. VI., Matric. VI., Extra V. and Lower VB, had not lost a mark, and share the picture.
Form Room Marks. Sp. VI., Lower VI., Matric. VI., Upper V. Lower IV., and Ill., share the cup, with no marks lost.
Finished Books. Sp. VA was best with 74 per cent., Lower VI. being second with 73 per cent.
Tennis brooches were won by: E. Hudson, V. Leys, M. Howes, P. Wood.
Cricket XI. colours by: D. Collier, H. Capel, K. Sargeaunt, 0. Tregelles, and Y. Leys.
Red Girdles. E. Banham, E. Birney, J. Douglas, N. Maude, P. Newharm, A. Paton, L Pears, H. Poynton, N. Preece, and H. Richards.
Juniors. R. Aldworth, P. Collins, N. Cooper, D. Leys, E. Palgrave, D. Richardson, L. Taylor.
Form Competition. The Senior Cup was won by Upper VI., and the Junior Picture by Form 11.
Milking Badges, given by Captain C. Bathurst, M.P., were presented to the 50 girls who had been through the course, and were certified as efficient by the Instructor. The Badges are of solid silver, about the size of a shilling, but thicker. They bear on one side a cow’s head in relief, with the motto “Pro Patria,” and on the reverse “Milking Test, Godolphin School, Passed by …,” leaving space for each girl to have her name engraved in the middle.
Miss Douglas then spoke of those leaving. The following are the names:­
School House. D. Collier, H. Elam, P. George.
Fawcett House. M. Stevens-Guille, D. Hinxman, W. Poynton, S. Yorke, C. Wilton, N. Cooper.
St. Margaret’s. L. King. D. Harvey-Jones, H. Toms, D. Caton, L. Gunner.
Nelson. B. Bridbe, 0. Tregelles, M. Wood.
New Forest. J. Dennison, B. Niven, M. Campin, I. Pears.
Sarum. H. Williams, V. Joscelyne, H. Brough, H. de Behr, b. Keble, E. Taunton, H. van der Meersch, M. Hardy, H. Swindells.
Lilian King, as head of the School, had a special clap. As Miss Douglas said, we shall miss her very much indeed, for she has given her very best to the School.
The special message which Miss Douglas had for those who were leaving was thee word “Vocation” = call. Some may have a very definite vocation, either to be doctors, or nurses, or to work at any other profession. But the call need not necessarily be away from home, only it will be one to SERVICE. Therefore be ready to answer it, even though it be to humble and trivial duties.
It is hard to say “Goodbye,” but if we all keep that word before us, you who go, and we who stay there will be unity among us, for it is not the shape of our work that matters, but the spirit of it. If we do it “with our might,” then we shall all be ONE.

AUTUMN TERM, 1916.
September 19th. Miss Douglas greeted us at Prayer-time, hoping that everyone felt fresh and ready for work. Speaking of the tone of the School, and for the need of it to go forward, for it can never stand still, she said: “We feel a special need for inspiration this term, having lost so many at the top of the School. This brings a respon­sibility to each one of us, for all can help to make the spirit of the School true and right. I am sure that Yvonne Leys will try to be a really good leader, and that the whole School will back her up.”
We heard that the Susan Esther Wordsworth Scholarship had been equally divided between Margaret Stevens-Guille and Vera Joscelyne.
The new girls this Term are:­
School House: Frances Pinckney, Upper IV.
St. Margaret’s: Decima Dome, Lower VA; Betty Du Buisson, Lower VB; Pearl Malony, Upper IV.; Faith Denny, Lower IV.
Nelson: Mary Cartwright, Upper VB; Kathleen Bridge, Special Parallel; Margery Sargeaunt, Lower IV. (from Sarum).
Fawcett: Vera Greene, Lower VI.; Natalie Lewarne, Upper VB; May Ashford, from Glenside, and Lucy Lock. Lower VA; Margaret Roseveare and Cicely Squire, Lower Vii.; Margaret Stow, Upper IV.
New Forest: Nora Cox, Lower VB.; Mary Trafford, Stephanie Chennells, Lucille Gossage, and Mary Panting, Upper IV.; Margaret Walker, and Molly Shawyer, Lower IV.; Celia Fraser, from Sarum House, II.
Sarum House: Frances Aitken and Judith Buckle, Upper IV. ; Mary Shorland, Lower IV. ; Margaret Symington and Margaret Cochrane, II.; Mary Griffin, Betty Luckham, and Muriel Arnold, from Kindergarten, and Constance Holford, I.
Janet Dennison, who learnt with Miss Ward, gained her L.R.A.M. diploma. She left in the Summer Term, and had been working for it here. It is the first time that a girl has gained this honour from our School.
September 25th. Miss Douglas told us the very sad news that Miss Grace Bagnall is leaving at the end of this Term. It is impossible to say how much we shall all miss her, but she thinks it right that she should go and live with her sisters.
Miss Douglas read a letter from Mr. Veasey, telling her of the sudden death of Mr. Pheasant, the Vicar of St. Andrew’s, Peckham, the part of the Mission which we help specially.
September 27th. Lady Hulse very kindly has given us a picture of the King. It is a beautiful one, and is to go in our gallery of notable people.
September 30th. Commem. Saturday. (See special notice.)
October 4th. We went to see the “Somme Battle Pictures,” which were marvellously vivid, and very interesting.
October 16th. Preparation for the National Mission. (See special notice.)
October 22nd. Miss Tovey, of the Church of England Zenana Society, very kindly came to give us an address on China.
October 27th. The National Mission Day for the whole School. (See special notice.)
October 30th. Miss Jones came to stay, and as Miss Hancock and Miss Steer were away she took part of their work, and was on the Staff till their return.

Games – Christmas 1916

CRICKET:

July 1st Fawcett beat Sarum on 1st innings by 13 runs.
Sarum: J. Carter 29 runs, V. Leys 15, D. Fanner 10.
Fawcett: M. Holmes 27, J. Chapman 18, U. Armitage 11.
St Margaret’s beat School by 19 runs.
St. Margaret’s: D. Harvey Jones 17, H. Capel 17 and 32, H. Toms 11.
School: C. Mackworth 19, D. Collier 11, P. George 12; C. Fletcher 16.
Nelson beat New Forest by 93 runs.
New Forest: M. Sinclair 28 runs.
Nelson: 0. Tregelles 30, G. Taylor 19, M. Chalcroft 2.5, M. Eppstein 20, N. Northeroft 19, P. Seal 10.
July 13th Fawcett beat New Forest by 239 runs on 1st innings.
Fawcett: P. Clarke 146, D. Hinsman 31, J. Chapman 30, M. Holmes 22.
New Forest: K. Still 11, J. Dennison 11.
School beat Sarum by 11 runs.
School: H. Elam 15, P. George 15, C. Fletcher 10, D. Collier 12, N. Clive Smith 10.
Nelson beat St. Margaret’s by 55 runs.
Nelson: G. Taylor 26, S. Wotton 17 and 10.
St. Margaret’s: H. Elworthy 16.

Nelson won all their Matches and therefore the Cup. Their fielding was very good. Fawcett came in a good second, and had the two Houses met it would have been an even match.

Phyllis Clarke (Fawcett) won the Running Cup with an average of 53 runs. Other good averages were M. Holmes (Fawcett) 25, who made consistently good scores. D. Collier (School) 26, G. Taylor (Nelson) 19.

The result of the matches was as follows:
­Nelson won 4 matches.
Fawcett won 3
School won 2
St. Margaret’s won 2
New Forest  won 1
Sarum won 0

Throwing Competition:
Senior winner, Eleanor Lea 57yds. 2ft. 13ins.
Junior winner, May Ashford 44yds. 1ft.

AUTUMN TERM

LACROSSE. We have begun our season without many of our best players, and we are missing them very much.

The new Captains are,
School: Eva. Hudson.
Sarum: Dorothy Turner.
St. Margaret’s: Hilda Elworthy
Nelson: Nancy Northcroft.
Fawcett: Nora Randall.
New Forest: Madge Glynn.

In the 1st round of the Lacrosse Tournament School beat New Forest by 6 goals to 5, Sarum beat St. Margaret’s by 9 goals to 3, Fawcett beat Nelson by 5 goals to 3. On the whole these matches were quite good. The teams played together and seemed to realise that strength lies in combination, and we hope for still greater improve­ment as the matches continue.

You cannot expect to play well until you can use your crosse properly, and thoroughly understand the game.

MILDRED P. WESTLAKE.

SUMMER TERM, 1916

TENNIS. The Cup was won by School, who won 4 rounds. Fawcett was a very close second, Sarum 2 rounds, possibly 3, Nelson and St. Margaret’s 2 rounds, New Forest 1 round.

The 2nd Sixes:
Fawcett won 4 rounds.
Sarum won 3
St. Margaret’s won 3
Nelson won 3
School won2
New Forest won 0

The Staff Match v, the Godolphin produced far better games than last year.

Staff Six.                                                   Godolphin Six.

Miss Pinckney                                           H. Elam
Miss C. Ashford                                        E. Hudson
Mr. Douglas                                                 Y. Leys
Miss Westlake                                           V. Leys
Miss Parson                                                 H. Capel
Mrs. Hewson                                              0. Treaelles

9 matches to 0 matches.

The match was much better than the score indicates as, although the Staff were very short of practice, they had very strong additions to their team in Mr. E. Douglas and in Mrs. Hewson.. The Godolphin did extremely well in winning a set off Mrs. Hewson and Miss Parson in three cases. The match began at 2.15 but did not finish till nearly six o’clock, owing to rather long intervals for tea and rest, and to the two long matches which ran into three sets and vantage games.

The American Tournament, divided into four divisions, were won by :-­

1st Division M. Sim – P Clarke
2nd J. Hinxman – H. Phillimore
3rd M. Thursby – M. Sinclair
4th J G. Farnfield – M. Figgis.

The Championship was won by E. Hudson after some very close matches with H. Elam in the semi-final 2-6, 6-2, 6-1, and in the final against Vera Leys. These two matches produced the best tennis that has been played so far by the School. I hope now the whole School has realized that good style will take anybody to the top of the School far quicker and far more easily than a self-taught bad style can ever do. Vera Leys, at the age of 14 could hardly have been in the final unless she had, from the beginning, always tried to play in the correct way.

The Second Sixteen Championship was won very easily by Mabel Sim, who only lost six games during her easy progress through her four matches. Another instance of the triumph of an easy graceful style over every other sort of style.

VIOLET M. PINCKNEY.

School News – Christmas 1915

AUTUMN TERM, 1915

September 22nd – School re-assembled after the summer holidays. Miss Douglas said she hoped we were all refreshed by them and ready to do our work well. She did not then speak of the arrangements for doing work for the year, but told us that we should fall into line with the organised women’s work.

Miss Douglas then welcomed the New Girls and read the rules and the list of Prefects. Miss Bagnall then read the form lists, as Miss Douglas has had trouble with her eves, and has to save them as much as possible. After that Miss Douglas welcomed the New Mistresses: Miss Eastgate, who has come from St. Cyprian’s, Cape Town, where she knew many of our friends; Miss Waller, who has come to help her at Oakhurst, and Miss Clarke, who has come from St. Paul’s to help for a time. Miss Douglas then said she knew we would sympathise with her and Miss Lucy in their pleasure in having their brother, Mr. E. H. Douglas, to live in Salisbury and to help in the Mathematics of the School. Miss Douglas was sorry to have to tell us that Mr. Atkinson, who had taught the carpentry so well, had died during the holidays; she said that Miss Pinckney was kindly going to help us with it. Miss Douglas then told us of several new arrangements in the School, the most exciting being that the two Mistresses’ Houses are to be next door to each other in Elm Grove Road, that the Kindergarten is now to be at Holmwood, and the whole of Rose Villa is to be used for School purposes. Also at Holmwood there are beautiful rooms for handwork.

Miss Douglas then gave us a motto for the term, “0 God my heart is ready.” She asked us to be ready, ready to give and ready to receive in everything we did; to receive all the good we could from our surroundings, and to give all we could, however little, to our generation.

The New Girls this term are School House: Cynthia Fletcher, Upper V.; Nora Maude and Marjorie Trayes, Lower V.; Rosemary Taylor, Lower IV.

St. Margaret’s: Hermione Felton. Joan de Coetlogon, and Katharine Pollock, Lower VB.

Nelson: Gertrude Taylor, Upper V.; Florrie Fagge, Lower VB; Annie Figgis, Upper IV.

Fawcett: Helen Poynton, V. Extra; Nancy Preece, Lower V.

New Forest: Florrie Cleland, Upper V.; Joan Abbott, Special VA; Katharine Hurst, Frances Wethered, and Hilda Wethered, Lower V.; Lettice Jenkins and Marjorie Thursby, Lower VB.; May Ashford and Marjorie Bennett, Upper IV.

Sarum: Esther Taunton, Upper V.; Molly Collins, Lower V.; Veronica Luard, Lower VB; Margaret Skey, Upper IV.; Grace May and Shirley Gurner, Lower IV.; Marie Claire van der Meersch, Patricia Collins, and Frances Banyard, III.; Nora Collins, Kathleen Neal, May Robinson, Barbara Waters, and Enid Skey, II.; Irene Arnold, Daphne Leys, and Nancy Metcalfe, I, from Kindergarten.

October 2nd – This would in ordinary years have been our Commemoration Saturday. We kept it by going, as we should have done, to the Celebration at St. Martin’s at 7.45, and there was a School Service at 9.45. In the afternoon we entertained a party of soldiers to tea at four, followed by a concert at five. (See special notice.)

October 6th – Gladys Crombie has taken her L.R.A.M. diploma for pianoforte playing.

October 8th – French Flag Day. Our collection at prayers went to the French wounded.

October 22nd – The collection at prayers was for the Red Cross Fund.

October 27th – At 8 o’clock in the School Hall Miss Fairclough and Miss Fraser gave lectures on economy. Miss Fairclough spoke of household economy and Miss Fraser of national finance and the need for national economy.

October 28th – Schools’ Service in the Cathedral at 8 p.m. The Dean of St. Paul’s preached.

October 29th – At School prayers we had special hymns, “Abide with me” and “The Saints of God,” and the 23rd Psalm in memory of the heroic life and death of Nurse Cavell. Our collection went to the fund for erecting a memorial to her.

October 30th – The second party for wounded soldiers was held. Mr. and Mrs. Chester gave a delightful entertainment. (See special notice.)

November 1st – All Saints’ Day. The whole School went to Evensong at 4 o’clock in the Cathedral.

November 2nd – Miss Douglas told us that arrangements had been made for a certain number of girls to learn milking. Captain Bathurst, the Member for South Wilts, has offered £10 to be given in prizes to the best milkers among those who have learnt before and those who are beginning for the first time. (See special notice.)

Eileen Cole-Baker has won first prize of £5 for German, second prize of £2 for English in the Entrance Examination of Dublin University.

November 21st – The School joined in the procession round St. Edmund’s parish, and went afterwards to the Special Mission Service in connection with the Bishop’s Campaign for bringing home the ” Call of the War.”

November 22nd – Mr. Isaacs, the Missioner at St. Martin’s, came and addressed the School on Prayer at 12.30.

November 23rd – Miss Douglas gave an address on “The Virtue of Dissatisfaction” at 12.5. (See special notice.)

SUMMER TERM, 1915

July 5th – Miss Douglas read the result of Miss Fanny Davies’ inspection, which was as follows :-

Prize: J. Dennison, pupil of Miss Ward; K. Connah, pupil of Fraulein Fehmer.

Award of Merit: D. Collier, pupil of Miss Atkinson; A. Foljambe, pupil of Miss Awdry; N. Legge, pupil of Miss Ward.

Commended: H. Rhodes, pupil of Miss Ward; H. Elworthy, pupil of Miss Ward; K. Northcroft, pupil of Miss Ward; W. Poynton, pupil of Miss Mixer; M. Du Buisson, pupil of Miss Awdry.

Commended for Czerny Study: M. Waters, pupil of Miss K. Harding.

July 5th-10th – Reading tests took place.

July 11th – Miss Goffe, who has succeeded Miss Moberly as S.P.G. Secretary for Girls’ Schools, came and spoke to us.

July 12th – Results of Reading Competition were announced. The judges asked for a pass standard for those who were not up to the standard for a badge, but yet reached a creditable level of accurate and intelligent reading. 64 Seniors entered.

July 14th – French Flag Day. The School assembled in the Hall after dinner to do honour to the day. Miss Douglas, Miss Helen Bagnall, and Miss Jeffries, carrying French flags, took their places on the platform; Miss Awdry at the piano. Miss Douglas explained why this day – the 126th anniversary of the fall of the Bastile – was chosen as the day on which to honour our noble Ally.

Miss Jeffries read two poems in French by Victor Hugo, a hymn written in 1831, and a poem written when France was feeling the humiliation of defeat at the hands of the Germans in 1871.

Miss Douglas read Laurence Binyon’s “France,” published in the Times, and Miss Helen Bagnall read a patriotic ballad by Mr. Cory exemplifying the chivalry of the French nation. We then stood while Miss Awdry played “The Marseillaise,” and then gave “three cheers for France.”

July 15th – Miss Douglas read a telegram from General Altham thanking them for the good wishes Miss Douglas sent him on behalf of the School when he left for the Dardanelles.

July 20th – The Musical Evening was held.

July 26th – Three expeditions were held: (1) The – Natural History Society went to Alderbury; (2) to Stonehenge, taken by Miss Hill; (3) to Old Sarum, taken by Miss Helen Bagnall.

July 27th – After prayers Miss Mitchell gave a very interesting lecture on the geographical aspects of the War, which made clear many points which we did not all realise before.

Miss Helen Bagnall then gave us some advice on how to read and how not to read. Miss Westlake, Miss Cranmer, Miss Steer, and Miss Derriman made us roar with laughter by giving us examples of various styles of reading to be avoided. Finally Miss Douglas read the delightfully funny poem “How the Pobble lost his toes.”

After break the March Playing Competition was judged by Miss Lucy, Miss Westlake, and Miss Hill. Finetta Bathurst was adjudged the best and Lilian King second.

At 12.30 Miss Atkinson showed her beautiful collection of seaweed; in the VI. Form.

In the afternoon those who were staying till Thursday were taken by Miss Lucy to Bemerton, where they saw Canon Warre’s beautiful garden, and had tea in a barn, and afterwards saw the Church.

July 28thMark Reading. Miss Douglas read the remaining mark lists, and then told us of the changes she proposed to make of the new forms. Matric. VI., of which Mr. Bayley was to be Form Master; Extra V., with Miss Oliver as its Form Mistress; and Lower VB, with Miss Jeffries as Form Mistress, and of the changes in form-rooms.

Miss Douglas then read two letters, one from Lady Smith-Dorrien thanking us for 250 little bags we had made for soldiers, and one from a prisoner thanking us for cakes sent him by Miss Fairclough, made in cookery classes.

Then came the results of the various Form Competitions.

Form Room Marks: Upper and Lower VI., Special VI., III., and I., no marks lost.

Cloakroom Marks: Form II, 3 marks lost.

Finished Books: Upper VI., 86.25%.

Mrs. Leys’ picture for the best garden throughout the year was divided between:

  1. Newson. M. Holmes.
  2. Medlicott. V. Hinxman.
  3. Du Buisson. M. Sim.

Cricket Colours were given to M. Holmes, D. Harvey Jones, P. Clarke, D. Alexander, E. Hudson, B. Bridge, K. Still.

The Running Cup was won by J. Adams.

Red Girdles were won by:

Senior.

M. Savory K. Still K. Sargeaunt
B. Medlicott I. Usher E. Field
H. de Behr L. Kettlewell

Junior.

M. Miller K. Beach B. Newson
J. Beach V. Lucas

The Junior Tennis Tournament was won by Nancy Chalk.

Miss Douglas then spoke of those leaving. We had to say good-bye to several Mistresses Miss Thicknesse, who has given so much to the School, and who is going to be head of Lady Margaret Settlement; Miss Hill, who has also done so much for us, and whom we are so sorry to lose; Miss Winn, who is going to St. Paul’s, and Miss Kenyon, who is going to be a missionary, and who has consequently our very best wishes.

Among the girls Dolly Wilson, Head of the School, must have a special clap. She has shown her love for her School in the best way and given of her very best to it. From Upper VI. Dacre Alexander, Prefect of New Forest, and Ruth Ainslie, Prefect of School House, are also leaving. From Special VI. Doris Gowenlock, Prefect of Nelson, May Smart, Prefect of Oakhurst, Olive Batchelor, Prefect of Glenside; also Avice Foljambe, from St. Margaret’s, Geraldine Preece, from Fawcett, and Dorothy Ware, from Sarum.

From Lower VI. Molly Thomas, Prefect of St. Margaret’s; Esther Field and Constance Keane, from School House; Cicely Pears, Norah Waters and Nancy Chalk from Sarum House.

From Special VA Sylvia Toms, St. Margaret’s; Auriol Chambers, Oakhurst; Margaret Bennett and Vera Penn, Sarum House.

In Upper V. Dorothy Ashford, Sarum House; Letty Kettlewell, Glenside.

In Lower V. May Waters, Sarum House, Form Prefect, and Marjorie Southwood, Nelson House.

In Upper IVA Violet Evans, Oakhurst.

Upper IVB Lorna Plummer, Sarum House.

Lower IV. Roy Ainslie, Nelson House.

Miss Douglas then spoke to us about some words of St. Paul. She said that to lay the foundations of a good character, it is necessary to love beauty and good work, and to educate our taste so that it becomes refined in the best sense. We must build something that will stand the test of fire, something worth building. We must, indeed.

Games – Christmas 1915

SUMMER TERM:

  1. Adams won the Senior Throwing Competition, and gave her prize (the price of a cricket ball) to the Red Cross Fund.
  2. J. Adams 59yds. 2 ft. 8 ins.
  3. D. Harvey Jones 57 yds. 2ft.
  4. Eppstein won the Junior Competition, and gave her prize to the S.P.G.
  5. M. Eppstein 48 yds. 2ft. 8ins.

 AUTUMN TERM:

The Lacrosse Tournament began on October 30th.

There are five rounds, and 75 per cent. of the number of girls in each House must play in the matches.

Fawcett beat St. Margaret’s by 8 goals to 1. They had a considerably stronger team in the field, and pressed most of the time. H. Toms was excellent in goal for St. Margaret’s, or the score would have been higher.

Nelson beat School by 6 goals to 2.

School House combined well, and D. Collier was good, also C. Mackworth in goal.

New Forest beat Sarum by 4 goals to 3. This was a poor game, Sarum particularly were weak.

November 6th – New Forest and St. Margaret’s drew 3 goals all. Both teams played the game though there were weak spots.

Nelson beat Sarum by 10 goals to 2. Nelson attack got through easily, as Sarum defence was not strong enough to hold them.

Fawcett beat School by 5 goals to 2. This was quite a good game, and the score describes it well, as Fawcett pressed slightly more. School House attack play very well together. Fawcett always play a good team game.

November 20th – Nelson beat New Forest by 6 goals to 1.

Nelson had a stronger team in the field, and their attack was too strong for New Forest defence, which was so slow in getting rid of the ball.

St. Margaret’s v. School drew 5 goals all, though School pressed mostly. St. Margaret’s defence was good.

Fawcett beat Sarum by 5 goals to nil. They pressed much more, and played well together. Sarum’s weakness was in lack of combination, not in individual strength, as there is good material to work on. D. Hinxman was particularly good for Fawcett.

On the whole the matches have been good, and every House should be able to put a good team in the field next term. The goalkeepers are good, especially S. Yorke, H. Toms, C. Mackworth, and E. Bartrum. The others save well, but do not clear far enough away, or accurately enough.

Sarum and Nelson are weakest in combined play, but both have good individual players. Fawcett and School combine well, which is particularly successful in School House attack. Fawcett defence is very supporting. St. Margaret’s and New Forest both play the game, but weak points allow opponents to break up the combination. St. Margaret’s defence is good.

MILDRED P. WESTLAKE.

Games

Spring Term 1915

LACROSSE – February 20th – Sarum beat Nelson by 4 goals to 3.

Sarum’s defence was very good, especially H. Williams. Nelson did not combine very well; the intention was there, but the capacity seemed to be lacking. The teams were well matched, but Sarum played a better game.

St. Margaret’s beat School House by 9 goals to 4. At full strength St. Margaret’s is the better team, but School House in this match were considerably weakened by substitutes. A. Foljambe was particularly good.

February 27th – Sarum beat New Forest by 7 goals to 2. New Forest played most pluckily with many substitutes. O. Batchelor was good in defence and M. Godley in attack. D. Wilson is a great support in Sarum’s defence.

St. Margaret’s beat Fawcett by 5 goals to 2. This was a good game. Fawcett played well together and continually pressed, but failed in shooting. St. Margaret’s combination was weakened by substitutes. H. Elworthy was good for St. Margaret’s, and Fawcett’s attack and defence wings were good.

March 6th – St. Margaret’s, beat Sarum in the Finals by 7 goals to 2. It was a hard-fought game, but the better team won. Sarum was weak in attack, chiefly owing to substitutes. G. Rigden was the best. St. Margaret’s played well together, but their strength is in their attack. The defences depend too much on crowding.

On the whole the matches were good, and the Houses at full strength would have been fairly even.