Jottings From The School Diary – Summer 1916

Eleven garments, sent to the Mayoress for Belgian children; 500 sandbags, 920 hospital bags, some trays and tables, sent to the Infirmary; various contributions, including plum puddings, sent to the Albert Hall Sale. Friday’s collections for War Funds amounted, to £22 1s. 8d.

ln December. – The House Marching Competition took place, and St. Margaret’s won the cup. The Red Girdles were won by:-

Senior.

VL Box. L. Gunner.
V. Joscelyne. M. Rose.
K. Keble. M. Blackett.
U. Armitage. B. Dunkin.
J. Osmond. C. Chambers.

Junior.
F. Banyard. K. Wright.

An Exhibition and Sale was held in the Studio of work done in the Drawing Classes, toys made by the Handwork Classes, and trays, &c., made in the carpenters’ shop. The proceeds amounted to £8 8s. 6d., which was sent to the Mayor for the Serbian Relief Fund.
On February 10th Miss Douglas returned to School after being away for a few weeks on account of her eyes. As she came into the Hall to take prayers Lilian King started a clap to show how delighted we all were to get her back. She thanked us all, and especially Miss Bagnall, for all we had done in her absence, and said how glad she was to be back amongst us.
In February the Staff gave a tea and concert to the wounded and convalescent soldiers from the Infirmary and Red Cross Hospital.
March 3rd. After prayers Miss Douglas spoke to us about the great meeting in the Guildhall to discuss the need of economissing throughout the Empire. Miss Douglas said that she thought we might all help by promising to give up Sweets to the end of the war. She spoke of the difficulties connected with doing this and how they could be overcome. Miss Douglas said that a board would be put up in the cloakroom on which those who were prepared to do this could sign their names; and she hoped that many other Schools belonging, to the Girls’ Schools’ Patriotic Union would do the same.

Advertisements

School News – Autumn 1914

Autumn Term, 1914

Oak Panneld hall donated by Miss Mary Alcie Douglas Headmistress 1890 - 1920

Oak Panelled hall donated by Miss Mary Alcie Douglas Headmistress 1890 – 1920

September 22. – School re-opened, and assembled in the Hall for the first time after it had been made so beautiful by the great kindness of Miss Douglas and Miss Lucy. Miss Douglas said that though there would be no Commemoration this year, our Hall would, perhaps, receive a more sacred dedication in the prayers which would be offered there for those who had gone to the front.

Miss Douglas then spoke of the subject which was on everyone’s mind. In this time of our country’s great need we all want to do all we can to help. First of all, we must do our own daily work as usual, only better, putting aside al selfishness, greediness, weakness, and idleness.

Then Miss Douglas told us what special plans had been made for us. The Geography, History, and Literature lessons are to be made intensely interesting, because they are to deal with things connected with the war. Every House is to have the Times, and the set of maps had been put up at School and in the Houses. We have also got a gallery of heroes, including him who we are so specially proud, General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien.

Miss Douglas then asked us to try and dwell on the glorious and heroic deeds, and not to read or talk about the shameful acts which the Germans seem, in many cases, to have committed. Miss Douglas then told us of the special plans which have been made for voluntary classes between 5.20 and 7.30 on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, in which we learn useful things, such as carpentry, cutting out, laundry, bandaging, knitting, &c.

On Saturday evenings we give up dancing for pleasure, and have instead a big Mission Work Party, so that our Mission may not suffer. Miss Lucy reads to us.

School begins a few minutes earlier in the morning, and very day at 10.50 there is a special Intercession Service in the Hall. Different prayers are used on different days, and we often sing the beautiful hymn, “Mighty Father of Creation,” written by Miss Bagnall’s brother-in-law. On Wednesday we pray by name for our relations and friends at the front, beginning with “General Smith-Dorrien and the officers and men under his command”; then follows a list of some 150 names of those dear to us at the font in the Army and Navy, or serving as doctors or nurses. Some of these names are already on the Nation’s Roll of Honour.

Carpentry in the Main Hall 1

Carpentry in the Main Hall

The School has joined the Girls’ Patriotic Union of Secondary Schools, of which H.R.H, the Princess Mary is the Patroness; Miss Gray, head mistress of St. Paul’s Girls’ School, the Hon. Secretary; and Miss Gadesden, head mistress of the Blackheath High School, the Hon, Treasurer. It is delightful to think that the girls in the schools of England are all uniting together in earnest endeavour and useful work at this time, and a great deal of trouble is taken to circulate useful information. Knitting and needlework for the sailors and soldiers has gone on most briskly all the Term, and large consignments of socks and shirts and housewives and many useful things have been sent to Lady Smith-Dorrien and other people for distribution. The carpenters, under Mr. Atkinson, have been hard at work, and hae made many splints and three strong bed tables, with long legs on castors, so that they can be moved about in the hospital wards. The Godolphin laundresses at Rose Villa wash regularly, under Miss Furneaux, for the red Cross Hospital, doing about 100 dusters and cloths, &c., a week. We hear that Old Girls who learnt their work at Rose Villa and The Wilderness are most useful as kitchen maids at the Red Cross Hospital, and are particularly to be trusted to clean the saucepans well. Miss Ashford has been commandeered to cook or to nurse at the Hospital as is required, and all the Godolphin Staff are spending every minute of their so-called spare time in helping in most valuable ways to meet the many, many needs that arise in connection with the war – getting up music for patriotic meetings and helping regularly in the Soldiers’ Guest House and the Central Hall Evenings for Girls.