Junior Literary Club Plays – Summer Term 1917

On May 31st you would hardly have recognised the Wilderness garden, which Miss Bagnall so kindly lent for the I., IL, IIL and Lower IV. Forms to act their plays in.
At 4 o’clock, if you had come into the kitchen at Rose Villa, you would have seen it strewn with various acting clothes, which some of the Lower IV. actors were trying to put on. We bad to cover ourselves over with long coats to hide our dresses.
At 4.30, the visitors arrived, and amongst them were Miss Douglas, Miss Lucy, Miss Bagnall and Miss Prosser.
There was a great deal of bustle and excitement, and the Chairman of the Literary Club announced that the 1st Form would now act their play. It was called ‘”The Dream Fairy,” written by Betty Clarke and Betty Salisbury. Muriel Arnold took the part of an old grandmother, and acted it very well. As there was no curtain, the Chairman hid, “Would you kindly shut your eyes while the first scene of the 2nd Form is being prepared?” It was a great temptation to open our eyes as we now and then caught glimpses of fairies, who were dressed in beautiful fairy-like frocks.
It was a most charming little play, called ” The Twins in Fairyland,” and was written by Betty Aldworth. The fairies did a sweet little dance, at the end of which the ‘Twins’ presented Miss Douglas with two lovely bunches of peonies. Mademoiselle Cornellie and Miss Oliver very kindly took a, great deal of trouble in arranging it, and making some of the dresses.
Then came the 3rd Form play, which was thrilling, and was called “The Desert Island.” Rachel Aldworth was the authoress, and was helped by other members of the Form. The savages acted their parts extremely well, and quite frightened us by piercing shrieks, as they rushed upon the poor shipwrecked crew, who were stranded on ” The Desert Island.” After the 3rd Form had finished acting their exciting play, the Lower IV. came upon the scene. Their play was called ” The Experiences of a Red Cross Nurse,” which was written by Peggy Savage and Marjorie Sargeaunt. All the plays were a great success, and we hope that all who were present enjoyed them.

P. SAVAGE
M. SARGEAUNT
LOWER IV.

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November 1915: A Poem – Christmas 1915

How sadly ends the short November day,
The skies are gray,
And far away
Our brave ones fight, and aching hearts still pray
O Lord! When shall all discord cease?
When dawn the day of peace?
And tears be wiped away.

They rest in peace, those Sons that mothers gave
England to save,
Through tears that lave,
And cleanse our land! But still we crave
O Lord, make discords cease,
Bring in the day of peace,
Save, Lord! O save.

The trees are bare, the golden leaves are shed,
We bow the head,
Tears for the dead
Filling the eyes from which all joy has fled!
And still we cry, Make wars to cease,
Bring back beloved Peace,
Enough of blood is shed!

Nay! Leaves may fall, but ever lives the tree!
And even we
On bended knee
Look up to God and hope once more to see
The day when wars shall cease,
The reign of blessed Peace
Lasting eternally.

 L.J. DOUGLAS.

School News – Summer Term 1915

SPRING TERM.

March 8th Mr. Marston, a blind clergyman, came to us and spoke about his work.

March 9th School Service taken by the Rev. H. Marston, who gave an address on Prayer.

March 11th Mr. Belloc’s Lecture. (See last issue.)

March 16th School Service taken by the Rev. A. G. Robertson, who spoke about “excuses.”

Governors’ Meeting.

March 24th School Service taken by Canon Sowter.

March 29th Mark Reading. This was one day earlier than the day fixed owing, to an outbreak of German measles.

Miss Douglas first read the results of the various competitions:

Cloak Room Picture, won by III; three marks lost.

Form Tidy Cup, won by Low. V., Sp. VB and II., who all lost no marks.

Finished Books, Top Up. VI., 78.81 per cent.

Red Girdles. Junior Girdles were given for the first time :¬

Senior: M. Thomas, O. Batchelor, J. Adams, D. Ashford, M. Chilton, P. Clarke, M. Ainslie, S. Lister, N. Richards, E. Hudson, K. Newson, P. Pinneger, V. Coles, and M. Wood.

Junior: M. Allan, M Leys, V. Arnold, G. Coles, M. Rose, M. Du Buisson, and M. Osmond.

La Crosse Pins: S. Yorke, B. Bridge, M. Holmes, H. Elworthy, FT. Elam, M. Godley, and D. Harvey-Jones. Those leaving were :

Special VI., E. Lock, prefect of Fawcett House.

Stanford, St. Margaret’s.

Lower V., M. Chalmers, Fawcett House.

Special VB., Violet Coles, Sarum House.

Lower IV., D. Chalmers, Fawcett House.

II, G. Smyth, Sarum House.

In saying ‘good-bye to those leaving, Miss Douglas said that she hoped that they would remember that the only way to be really happy was by serving others, and that they would stamp their lives with the word “service.” She also said that she hoped that those who were going home would continue there the things they had begun at school. Miss Douglas said she would not say much to the school, as she had had many talks during the term. She hoped all would listen to the lessons of which the holidays would be full-Confirmation for some, Good Friday and Easter, and the message of renewed hope which comes with spring.

March 31st The Confirmation Day. Owing to some of the candidates having had German measles, it was arranged that they should be confirmed separately at St. Mark’s Church by Bishop Joscelyne, at the same hour as the service held in the Cathedral. A few days before Finetta Bathurst was confirmed in Exeter Cathedral, as she had had to go home owing to whooping cough. The following is the full list of the girls who were confirmed this term: C. Mackworth, M. Ainslie, J. Dewe, J. Eason, I. Pears, J. Pears, H. de Behr, P. Blunt, G. Rigden, M. Osmond, M. Hardy, D. Turner, M. Constable, H. Livesey, M. Glynn, P. Clarke, M. Eppstein, P. Godwin, P. Seal, N. Northcroft, K. Sargeaunt, S. Wotton, M. Wood, M. Vines, P. Du Buisson, K. Newson, F. Bathurst.

SUMMER TERM.

April 25th School re-opened on St. George’s Day. The flag was flown, and we sang the hymn, “The Son of God goes forth to War,” and the collect for S. Michael and All Angels was read.

Miss Douglas then read the results of the Associated Board of the R.A.M. and R.C.M., Local Centre, April, 1915.

We were very glad to hear that Canon Sowter was to be a Governor of the School, and clapped heartily.

New Prefect. Fawcett House, M Stevens-Guille.

Miss Douglas read the written rules, and reminded us that there are besides many unwritten rules, which are very important. Their observance comes naturally to those who have the right spirit.

Miss Douglas then spoke a little about the life of St. George and what he stands for. He is the champion of Right fighting for the Cross and prevailing against the Dragon, the type of all that is base, cruel, and deceitful. St. George was taken to be the Patron Saint of England by Edward III., and therefore all English men and women are bound to fight with determination under his banner against all manner of evil.

In the Wiltshire Arts and Crafts Exhibition of April, 1915, B. Niven gained a 1st class certificate for drawing from the round, and R. Ainslie a 1st class certificate for pencil drawing from life. A sheet of brushwork by various girls was also granted a 1st class certificate. A Foljambe’s work was commended.

April 26th Our new Governor, Canon Sowter, brought the Archbishop of Armagh to speak to us. The Archbishop expressed his doubts at being able to talk to girls until he was told to speak as he would to boys. He then told us to remember that the honour of a school depends on its individual members, and he also spoke of the important place of friendship in life, and quoted a boy’s definition of a friend, “One who knows you well and likes you still.”

April 27th Miss Douglas and the Staff went to meet the Archbishop at the Training College, by the invitation of Canon and Mrs. Sowter and Miss Forth, the Principal.

April 28th In the evening the Rev. Denis Victor, of the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa, and the Principal of St. Michael’s College, Likoma, for training native students who become teachers, came and spoke to us about his work.

April 30th Miss Yuille Smith, who stayed some time at Fawcett House with her son Bobbie, gave us a delightful piano recital in the Hall.

May 1st Saturday. After supper we made bags for the soldiers in hospital to keep their possessions in.

May 6th Miss Douglas told us of Lord Methuen’s appeal for books, games, &c., for the new base hospital at Malta.

May 7th Mr. Belloc gave us a second lecture. The subject was, “The War and the Political Situation in Europe.” (See special notice).

May 8th We heard that Ruth Wordsworth and her brother, who were passengers on the Lusitania, which was torpedoed on Friday, May 7th, were saved. In the evening we had a second War Work Party.

May 13th Ascension Day Service St. Martin’s at 8 a.m., and short service in School in the morning and evening. It was too wet to have a picnic, but it was a very happy festival all the same. We stayed in our Houses and did what we liked till 5 o’clock, when there was dancing in the Hall till 6.30.

May 20th Annual Service at St. Saviour’s. We sent a special offertory of £3, but, owing to the war, no representatives.

May 24th Empire Day. We had a short service at 12.20, and Miss Helen Bagnall gave a short address. (See special notice).

May 28th Miss Douglas read a letter of thanks from Lady Smith-Dorrien for the 150 holland bags sent, and said that 100,000 more were needed.

June 9th Service of Song at 8 o’clock, to which the Members of the League of Honour came.

June 10th Miss Douglas told us that Lady Hulse had consented to become a Governor of the School. The good news was received by a great clap.

June 11th Half Term. Those who did not go away stayed at St. Margaret’s with Miss Lucy.

Head Mistresses Conference, held this year at Walthamstow. Miss Douglas stated that some farmers had accepted her offer to let the School help in their hay fields.

June 16th The girls began to help with the hay, and continued to do so for several days, working in shifts.

June 21st Clarinda Allen got 3rd Class in the Historical Tripos, Part II., and in Natural ‘Science, Part I., Ivy Phillips got 3rd Class.

June 27th On Sunday afternoon Mrs. Creighton (widow of the late Bishop of London) very kindly came and spoke to the School at 5 o’clock.