Jottings From the School Diary – Christmas Term 1917

SUMMER TERM, 1917.

SATURDAY, JUNE 30TH – The March Playing Competition took place. Miss Westlake and Miss Awdry judged. There were 18 entries. E. Lea won the Competition.
MONDAY, JULY 9TH – The Local Schools Music Examination took place.
TUESDAY, JULY 10TH Miss Douglas told us at Prayers that C. Fletcher, M. Eppstein and H. Williams had passed “Responsions.”
MONDAY, JULY 16TH – A meeting was held to decide what funds the proceeds from the Sale should be given to. The result was that £500 was given to Queen Mary’s Needlework Guild, and £300 to the Red Cross.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 18TH – Mr. Schooling spoke to us on “Finance.” (See Special Notice.)
TUESDAY, JULY 24TH – The Musical Evening was held. After supper, instead of the end of term Dance, we went for 10 minutes strolls through the grounds.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 25TH – At 9.40 Miss Steer gave a very interest­ing lecture on “The War.” At 12 Miss Atkinson gave us a delightful Piano Recital.
THURSDAY, JULY 26TH – Mark Reading. Cloak Room Picture was won by Upper VA., and the Lower VA. and with 1 mark lost.
Form Room Cup was won by Special VI. and Lower IV. with no marks lost.
Finished Books-Upper VL was best with 82 per cent. Lower VI. being second with 80 per cent.
Reading Badges were won by the following leaving girls: Joan Eason, Penelope Newham, Dorothy Powney and Dorothy Turner.
The Tennis Cup was won by Sarum.
The 2nd Six Picture was won by Fawcett. The Championship was won by V. Leys.
Tennis brooches were won by M. Sim, G. Rigden and G. Taylor, Mrs. Leys wishes to give a picture next year to the House which keeps its courts marked best. Bad marks will be given for crooked lines, courts not marked out in time, and for want of care of the “corners.”
1st XI. Cricket Colours were won by J. Chapman, J. Hinxman, D. Turner, V. Greene and N. Northcroft.
The Cricket Cup was won by Fawcett House. The Running Cup was won by Y. Leys.
Red Girdles: Senior Girdles were won by M. Sim, S. Robertson, M. Thursby, G. Farnfield, L. Locke, P. Seal, J. Gunner, K. Gordon­ Duff, M. Waters, L. Taylor, and K. Beach. Junior by R. Aldworth.
The Red Girdle Form Cup was won by Upper VI. and Special VI, with 100 per cent. each.
The Junior Red Girdle Picture was won by Lower IV. with 42 per cent.
The Gardening Picture was won by Fawcett House.

Miss Douglas then spoke of the leaving Mistresses and Girls and wished them good-bye. She said she was not going to say much about Miss Parson. We all knew what a tremendous loss she was to her per­sonally, and what good and faithful work she had done for the School. She said how much Mrs. Pope would be missed by her House and spoke of the long time she had been with us. She gave her very best wishes to Miss Eastgate and Miss Waller and thanked them for all they had done to help us since they came to Oakhurst. She said how sorry we were to lose Miss E. Prosser and Miss Templeton, who had so kindly come to help us for a short time, and she gave her best wishes to Miss Fisher, who has worked so well with her Form and is now leaving to take up nursing. She then spoke of thee leaving Girls.
Y. Leys, who has been such an excellent leader as Head Girl. She came to the kindergarten when she was five years old and has been such a good and devoted member of Godolphin ever since. She is the first “grandchild ” of the school who was been Head Girl. Miss Douglas said how much Yvorne had been helped by her mother, herself a most devoted Old Girl of the school. She then asked for a special. clap for Yvorne, thanking her for her loyalty and helpfulness. Yvorne is going to St. Paul’s School to help with the games next term.
Miss Douglas then gave her very best wishes to the other girls who are leaving this term, D. Turner, D. Powney, P. Newham, E. Waters, M. Shorland, P. Turner, and N. C. Van der Meersch.

AUTUMN TERM, 1917.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER, 26TH – School re-opened. After welcom­ing us back and hoping we had had jolly holidays, Miss Douglas told us of several alterations with regard to the Houses. Oakhurst has changed its name and will in future be known as Hamilton House. Lady Hulse has named it for us. We cannot have a Hulse House, because that name has been bestowed upon the house which Lady Hulse has presented to the City in memory of her son, so she chose Hamilton, as the Hamiltons are connected by marriage to her family. Miss Hartnell is the new housemistress there, with Miss Brownrigg to help her. The house is big enough now to stand alone for school com­petitions and “New Forest,” the name given to the three houses who combined, has disappeared. Mrs. Pope’s house” The Cedars” was given up when she left, and her girls with an additional six have taken up their abode under Mrs. Paulley’s charge at the house which was known as St. Martin’s Clergy House. This house has the honour of being named after our chairman, Lord Methuen, and is called Methuen House. They will join up with Glenside for games and House competitions and have already shown us that they intend to be a strong and keen House. Mrs. Paulley belongs by rights to St. Margaret’s, but they have had to give her up with a good grace to head a House of her own. The other big change, as to houses, has been the joining up of the two mistresses’ houses in Elm Grove which is now to be called Melbury. Miss Douglas then told us that Miss Buckle, who is an Old Girl, has come to teach History, Miss Alcock to teach English, and Madmoiselle Marchau, French. Miss Spencer has come to be Miss Douglas’s new Secretary in Miss Parson’s place.
Miss Douglas talked to us about determination and judgment. She told us what a great hunter, Dr. Gray, said, “I throw my heart over and my horse follows me.” When we want to accomplish anything we must put our whole hearts into it and aim high; we must have a high ideal of what our work and games at school should be, we must make a picture of it in our minds and then turn the picture into a reality.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29TH – We kept “Commem.” in a most delightful and inspiring way, though as long as the war lasts we know that there cannot be a real Commem. with the Old Girls flocking back to the old School. We all went to the celebration at St. Martin’s at a quarter to 8, and at 9.30 there was a service in School when we thought very specially of the Old Girls. At 5.50 we re-assembled at School and had a very exciting and interesting meeting in the Hall (see Special Notice.)

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15TH – Several girls went to an excellent Concert in the Town given by some Belgian artistes.
Miss E. Prosser very kindly sent the School a volume of Creighton’s “Queen Elizabeth,” for which we wish to thank her very heartily.
Lady Hulse has sent us a delightful edition of Haydn’s Dictionary of Dates. It has been decided to keep both these volumes in the VI. Form Reference Library.
At Break the School assembled and Mrs. Leys presented us with a beautiful silver cup for the Tennis Champion. She promises to give a miniature cup to any girl who wins the Championship three years running. The cup was then presented to Vera Leys, who won the Championship last term.
During October there was an Exhibition of Household Economy held in the Town. Batches of girls, under the charge of a mistress, went daily to see the Exhibition and also to hear some of the very interesting lectures on Cookery, Poultry Keeping and Gardening.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31st – The Schools’ Service was held at the Cathedral at 6. The Bishop of Kensington preached.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1st (All Saints’ Day) All who were able went to the Cathedral for evensong, and Miss Douglas had a service in the Hall for the others at School at 8.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th – A party of girls and the Head Mistress from Bruton came to see the School. They were shown every­thing by Upper VI, who were excused the first lesson after break.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14TH – The School went to a delightful concert in the Town given by Miss M. V. White, Miss S. Eaton and Boris Lensky. (See Special Notice).

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24TH – A party of about 84 wounded soldiers from the Red Cross and the Infirmary came to a concert and tea. (See Special Notice).

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27TH – Miss Douglas read us a letter at Prayers from the 2nd Southern General Hospital to thank for two pairs of crutches made by us, and to say they would be glad of as many more as we can possibly make.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29TH – Miss Douglas’ birthday. She had to spend mast of it in London to attend a meeting of Head Masters and Mistresses called by Sir Arthur Yapp, the Food Controller, to discuss the question of feeding in the Schools.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1ST – Serbian exhibition and lecture. (See Special Notice).

MONDAY, DECEMBER 3RD – House Marching Competition judged by the Sherborne drill mistress.
Nelson House won the cup.
In the evening a lecture by Dr. Lloyd on Canada. (See Special Notice.)

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5TH – In the evening the Assistant ­Chaplain-General of the Forces (Rev. F. G. Tuckey) gave an address (see Special Notice) to the School, at which members of the League of Honour were also present.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7TH – The annual speech day of the Godolphin School was held, when the certificates gained during the year were distributed to the, successful scholars by Sir Henry Newbolt. The gathering was attended by a large number of parents and friends. Canon Morrice presided, and was supported on the platform by the Hon. Lady Hulse, Miss Style, Miss Hussey, Sir Henry Newbolt, the Mayor (Mr. J. Macklin), Archdeacon Dundas, Canon Myers, Mr. J. M. Swayne, and the Headmistress (Miss Douglas).

At the outset, Miss Douglas said they had looked forward with a great deal of pleasure to seeing Lady Newbolt present to distribute the certificates, but she had just received a letter from her stating that her father had died, and therefore she was unable to be present. It was extremely kind of Sir Henry Newbolt to have attended, and she asked him to convey their deep sympathy to Lady Newbolt in her bereave­ment. Miss Douglas then asked the permission of the Governors of the School to send a cable to their Chairman, their own Field-Marshal, Lord Methuen, who was in Malta. conveying to him greetings from that gathering and good wishes in his great work there. (Ap­plause.)

Miss Douglas presented her report for the year. (Extracts from the Report):

The Health of the School – It is with great thankfulness that I am able to tell you that the health of the school has been very good. There were several cases of German measles earlier in the year, and a few cases of chicken-pox, but the Sanatorium has not been opened once this term, and during the past eight months has only been required for two cases of chicken pox.

The Number of Girls in the School – The school has been quite full all the year, with an average number of 215 girls. This term there are 218 – 144 being Boarders; and 74 Sarum House. There is a long waiting list.

The Regular Work of the School – It is no wonder in these stirring times that I am able to report that the school is shewing on the whole an increasing spirit of earnestness in work, and a greater inter st in trying to discover in what direction each one may best be able to be of service when school days are over. The weak places in our ranks which show a lack of thoroughness and perseverance are, I feel sure, not going to remain weak if the air around them is strong and bracing. The girls take no public examination until they reach the Lower VIth Form, at the age of 16 or 17, so that the work all the way up the school till then has a really good chance of being enjoyed for its own sake. At the same time, it is being done with a thoroughness on the part of teachers and girls that should make the examination test no great terror when it has to be undergone. I think my dislike of examinations in themselves is thoroughly well-known, and my work as a member of Examination Committees in London is always on the side of giving candidates a choice of subjects, and against what I believe is the fetish of making any subject compulsory, except perhaps the mother tongue. But as Ion- as examinations are there as the entrance gate to further education, training, or useful work in any field, we must just take them without making any needless fuss about them. We try to get them done in the Lower VIth, and then the last year at school feels delightfully free for working in any way that best suits the in­dividual. If a scholarship at a University is in view then that shapes the work for that particular girl, but scholarship work is highly in­teresting, and is sure to be in subjects for which there is natural inclination and aptitude. I will presently read the examination results, only saying now that all who took the Senior Cambridge Examination passed in every subject and gained the exemptions from other examinations which they were trying for. Besides the time-table work of the school, many other things take place which are particularly interesting, and certainly of educational value, such as the reading aloud competition for the reading badge, the house sinning compe­tition, the English literary Society, the French society, not to speak of the extraordinary value of the training, and the very great enjoyment of the games. All these things have been active during the past year. Since my last report we have had the following lectures and addresses, Mr. Shaw McLaren on the wonderful work of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals; Mr. Bedford Pym on National Flags; Miss Gray, the Headmistress of St. Paul’s Girls’ School, on teaching as a national service; Mr. Schooling on true patriotism; Miss Radford on the work of the Serbian refugees in Corsica, where she has been for eighteen months; Dr. Lloyd on Canada; and a very stirring address from the Assistant Chaplain-General to the Forces.

I must now speak of a new boarding-house which has been opened this term, as Mrs. Pope, who had been with us so many years, gave up her house to fill the important post of lady-superintendent of the Diocesan Training College of Fishponds, Bristol. Her girls at the Cedars were very sorry to lose her, but, have shown their loyalty to her good training by throwing themselves heart and soul into giving the new house a good start. Another thing that has helped to inspire this new house with the right feeling was the permission by cable from our own particular Field-Marshal, Governor of Malta, to call it Methuen House. So, there it is, a very happy house, with Mrs. Paulley in charge whilst her husband is abroad with the Forces, and Miss Chawner to help her. Another house must be specially mentioned. Miss Eastgate left us at the end of last term to join the W.A.A.C. after being the head of Oakhurst, and also giving delightful lessons in English literature in the school. Miss Waller, her helper at Oakhurst, left us at the same time, and is a House Mistress at Birkhamstead. Their places have been taken by Miss Hartnell, who has given up her im­portant post on the Staff of the Lincoln High School) to come and be the head of what was Oakhurst, and also to teach literature here. She is helped by an old friend of mine, Miss Brownrigg who has done such valuable work for children in South London. The name of the house has been changed from Oakhurst, which had no particular significance for us, and has been re-christened by Lady Hulse with the name of Hamilton House. We should have liked to call it Hulse House, but that name already belongs to the house given by Lady Hulse to social work in the city. She, therefore, chose Hamilton House, as being the name, which connects the Hulse family with Salisbury. She already speaks of it as her house, so we know what to expect of it! There are now seven houses, School House, founded by the will of Elizabeth Godolphin, who looks down upon us from that wall. Her will as to founding this school is engraven in stone in the cloisters of Westminster Abbey. Some hundred years later Sarum House came into being, or in other words, day girls were added to the little party of boarders. Between the years 1895 and 1917 St. Margaret’s, Nelson House, Fawcett House, Hamilton House, and Methuen House have been added to the school. The greater the number of Houses, the more important does it become that the larger School spirit shall mingle with and dominate the House spirit, to the avoidance of anything in the nature of clique or an unworthy kind of rivalry, and I am thank­ful to say that all the leading girls are at one with the Heads of the Houses and myself in this matter. Strong friendships are being made between girls belonging to different Houses and to give and take in work and games is heartily enjoined as part of the very salt of school life.
Yet another House must be mentioned, and that is the Mistresses’ House called Melbury, in Elm Grove-road. Two convenient houses have been thrown together this term and there 13 of the regular staff live, and Mrs. Bacchus has gone very near to accomplishing the im­possible by the masterly way in which she has secured their comfort at this time when housekeeping is so difficult.

The following is a list of awards:­
HONOURS, &C. OLD GIRLS:

Mary Gordon, who obtained a First in Greats at Oxford, has now gained the certificate of merit in letters, B. Litt. for a thesis on Greek oligarchies; Kathleen Connah, R.C.M. Council’s Exhibition for Piano (£8), R.C.M. Pauer Memorial Exhibition for Piano (£7 10s.), and R.C.M. Director’s Prize for Elocution. Marv Tracey, London University Matriculation; Honor Williams, Oxford Responsions; Monica Savory, Oxford Responsions.

PRESENT GIRLS:

(July) Oxford Responsions (Latin, Greek and Algebra), Cynthia Fletcher, Mary Eppstein. Oxford and Cambridge Joint Board: Higher Certificate, M. Ainslie, French, Botany History, English; M. Sinclair, French, Botany (completing certificate).

Senior Cambridge Local Examination. Eleven candidates took this examination, and all passed in every subject. Eight passed in all the subjects necessary to obtain exemption from the London Matriculation Examination. 2nd Class Honours, K. M. Hirst, English Essay and Literature, English History, Latin, French, Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. 3rd Class Honours, M. M. Dalston, English Essay and Literature (v.g.), English History, Latin, French (distinguished), Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. 3rd Class Honours, S. G. Lister, English Essay and Literature, English History, Latin, French, Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. Pass, N. M. Blackett, English Essay (v.g.) and Literature, English History, French, Arith­metic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. Pass, S. T. Wotton, English Essay and Literature (v.g.) English History, Latin, French, Arith­metic, Geometry, Algebra. Pass, S. A. Clive-Smith, English Essay and Literature (dist.), English History, French, Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. Pass, D. M. Turner, English Essay and Literature, Latin, French, Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra, Botany. Pass, J. R. Chapman, English Essay and Literature, English History, Latin, French, Arithmetic (v.g.), Geometry, Algebra. Pass, V. M. M. Greene, English Essay and Literature (v.g.), English History (distinguished), French, Arithemetic, Botany. Pass, C. Mackworth, English Essay (v.(Y.) and Literature, English History, French, Arithmetic, Botany, Drawing. Pass, Y. S. Leys, English Essay and Literature, English History, French, Arithmetic, Botany.

Music – Local Centre of Associated Board (R.A.M. and R.C.M.) Ivy Moon has passed the Piano Higher Division of the Schools’ Examination of the Associated Board (Miss Coombs’ pupil). Advanced Grade. Violin, Joyce Carter (Miss N. Harding’s pupil); Intermediate. Violin, G. Bacchus (Miss Ward’s pupil).

Local Schools (R.A.M. and R.C.M.) Examiner, Mr. 1TcEwan. Violin Higher, Helen Livesey and Eileen Douglas. Violin Higher, Kathleen Sargeaunt and Mavis Leys; Cello Lower, Vera Leys; Piano Higher, Mary Rose, Muriel Harris and Mavis Leys; Piano Lower, Evelyn Birney, and Barbara Mules; Piano Primary, Kitty Earle.

Miss Fanny Davies. Prize N. Figgis. Awards of Merit, Mary Dalston, Helen Theodosius, Lilly Shannon, Margaret Chilton, and Marjory Glynn. Highly commended, Felicite Monier-Williams, Mavis Leys. Commended, Hilda Elworthy, Phyllis Clarke and Wenonah Wood.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10TH – Miss F. Davies’ Concert. (See Special Notice.)
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11TH – We heard that Jerusalem had been taken by the British Forces. Miss Douglas told us at prayers, and we gave thanks that after all these centuries the Holy City is now in the hands of a Christian Nation.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12TH – Mark Reading in the afternoon. The various Challenge Cups were presented, and Miss F. Davies prize was won this year by Betty Buxton. Awards of merit gained by Mar­garet Walker, Lit Taylor, Cath Harrison, Lettice Jenkins, M. Dalston. Highly Commended, F. Monier-Williams, C. Coombs. Commended, Ivy Moon.
Tidy Marks -Form Room Cup. No marks lost by Up. VI., Up. Sp. VI., Low. VI., Low. Sp. VI., Low. V.B., Low. IV., Cloak Room picture won by Up. Sp. VI.
Sight Reading Music Competition – Hamilton House top.
Gardening poem cup won by M. Blackett; gardening picture won by School House; red girdle picture, Lower School, won by Lower IV.; red girdle cup, Upper School, won by Up. VI. and Up. V.
Reading Competition. School House top.

Miss Douglas said a few words to the girls about their journeys and how they were to be as helpful and steady as possible, giving no unnecessary trouble to the railway officials in these difficult times. She then told them to try and have very happy holidays by making other people happy. She then wished good-bye to those leaving: ­
Matron, who has been such a tremendous help to everybody and will not only be missed very much indeed by School House but by the whole school.
Miss Maunsell, who has given such capital help since she has been with us, must have a little share in the big clap for Matron. She then gave her very best wishes to all the girls leaving this term, M. Blackett and K. Hirst from Hamilton House; M. Sini, L. Plunkett, L. Box, B. Fagge, from Fawcett House; M. Newson and M. Constable, Sarum House; M. Howes, from St. Margaret’s; and K. Earle, from Nelson House. Miss Douglas finished by reminding us of the different ad­dresses we had had the great privilege of hearing this term, speaking so forcibly again and again of the influence of women and girls, and she reminded us that it always matters much more what we are than what we do. It is character which tells, and it is now, during school days, we must form our characters if we want to be capable of exercising that tremendous influence for good which our country expects of us.

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News of Old Mistresses and Girls – Christmas Term 1917

Monica Savory tells us that she passed Responsions in July, so hopes to go to St. Hugh’s next October. She is now working at the Warwick Record Office. She says: “A great deal of the work has to do with the casualties, and in one section they send out the notice to the next ­of kin when the men are killed or wounded. We get in all the documents belonging to the men, their attestations, medical histories, wills, &c., and we keep a record of all their military service, wounds, medals, campaigns, and all particulars about their families.”

Dorothy Lowe, writing about the usual date for Commem, says “I feel to-day we ought all to be travelling Salisbury roads,” She had had a lovely week-end with Joe Hensley, and had run up against Naomi Peak and had also come across May Dickinson at the massage examinations. She has got her first massage post at Cambridge in the 1st Eastern General Hospital, 24 big wards all huts. She says her brother was near Arras with a search light.

Eva Tatham is still a Clerk in the 4th Southern General Hospital at Plymouth. Her uncle has been made a Brigadier-General and head of all Naval and Marine Recruiting at the Admiralty. She says she was given 24 hours’ leave, so was able to be bridesmaid to Phillipa Murray (nee Kitchener). Phillipa’s husband is in the R.F.C. and in Palestine.

Mary Gordon, obtained the Certificate of Merit in Letters (equivalent to the B. Litt.) for her thesis on Greek Oligarchies at Oxford. She says “My Oxford life seems quite far away now after a term in Man­chester. I am very happy indeed here, and like the school and the girls and my work and my colleagues very much.”

Dorothy Kent writes from Durham. She says she and Joan Shorto meet and talk Godolphin. Her brother, who has had to be put into C3 Class owing to a bad knee, is now in the High Commissioner’s Office in London. She gives an interesting account of the soldiers’ huts in Durham, and says how busy every body is preparing eggs, salads, vegetables, fruit, sandwiches, cake, tea, coffee, and cocoa.

Isabel Rennie is working in the laundry of the Hospital at Sidmouth, and says the laundry work she learnt in LoweriV. has come in very useful.

Chrissy Leslie-Jones (nee Baskett) is leaving her home in Lahore, as the following notice will explain. We congratulate her upon her husband’s appointment to the Principalship of the Mayo College: ­”Your readers have already learnt of the appointment of Mr. F. A. Leslie-Jones to the Principalship of the Mayo College, Ajmer, and Mrs. and Mr. Leslie-Jones’ consequent departure from Lahore, where they have resided for thirteen years. It is difficult to think of a change which could occasion more widespread regret in the Province. As head of the institution through which the scions of the leading Indian families pass on their way to manhood. Mr. Leslie-Jones has, of course, played a very important role in the political life of the Punjab, and his loss will be a very real one to Indians. The active part moreover which lie and his wife have taken in promoting sport among the European community in the Capital, and their untiring support of all social in­stitutions and undertakings have been so very marked that their places will be very difficult to fill. A cricket week without ‘L.J.’ and a Punjab tennis tournament without Mrs. Leslie-Jones will be hard to imagine. Still Ajmer is not so very far away, and we may see something of them occasionally.”

Ruth Strange is nursing at The Anglo-Russia Hospital, Petrograd, Stephanie Strange is about to commence work with the motor trans­port, the small V.A.D. Hospital where they were previously working being temporarily closed.

P. Turner sends an interesting account of her first term at St. Paul’s School. She has gone into the VI. 3 Form and likes her work very much. If she gets her remove next year she is expected to take the Senior Cambridge. She says she has spoken to Miss Ash, she also says “I am getting up a little party which we call the Godolphin Re-union. We are asking as many Old Godolphinites as we can collect to lunch and tea on November 18th. Yvorne Leys is helping us. There is Miss Hymans de Tiel and Dacre Alexander and Eva Bartruni, from the Medical School, and Jean Chapman and Phyllis Clark live quite near us. I am so looking forward to it.”

Gladys Scott says: “This is just a very short letter to tell you that I am going to Paris next seek to be secretary to a great friend of my chief (who is still in India). He is running the Y.M.C.A. for the American troops. I think the work should be very interesting, and he writes that there is plenty of it!”

Nancy Humphries is nursing in the Royal Naval Hospital, Truro. She has been there since the Hospital opened nearly two years ago and likes it very much. Olive Prater cooks at a Red Cross Hospital in Budleigh Salterton.

Phyllis Codwin is learning how to drive an ambulance. She hopes to drive the wounded straight from Southampton to hospitals in Winchester.

Kathleen Sargeaunt is getting on splendidly with her cooking and housecraft at Malvern.
Lilly Shannon is living in London and preparing for a secretary’s post.
Nancy Northcroft is going on with her music and helping at home.

Katharine Hulbert is among the Wiltshire nurses whose names have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War for valu­e able services rendered in connection with the war.

S. Yorke is working for a degree in Agriculture at St. Andrew’s Hall, Reading, and she much enjoys the training.

J. Hinxman is busy helping at home, where she takes some of the lessons in the morning and works at a Red Cross Hospital in the after­noons.

M. Holmes is orderly at Longford Castle Hospital.
C. Preece is nursing in the officers’ ward at Queen Mary’s Hospital for Women in London.
L. Poynton packs for the A.O.D. voluntary workers at Didcot near her home, and meets Ursula Armitage at the same work.

Lucy Seton, having had previous training, went as V.A.D. to Drum­tochty Castle, Kincardineshire, when war broke out, it being lent as a V.A.D. Hospital. When it closed a year afterwards, she came to Edinburgh, and worked in a private nursing home for some months. From Edinburgh she went to the hospital at Balham and was there till August, 1916, and then proceeded to St. Paul’s Hospital at Malta. She remained there till it was re-organised as the 63rd General Hospital and sent to Salonika. She re-engaged with it and accompanied it to Salonika, where she now is, for, at any rate, a further period of six months.

Constance Wollastan, after doing various odd war jobs, was trained as a policewoman, and was sent to Gretna Munition Factory, and thence to Carlisle. She was promoted Sergeant, June, 1917. She was moved shortly afterwards to East Riggs, Dumfriesshire. She was obliged to resign at the end of September as she was ill, but after a period of rest and convalescence with friends in Scotland, she was appointed Assistant Welfare Superintendent at Elswick Works, Newcastle-on­Tyne, at the end of October, 1917.

Margaret Fawcett, who has been in Russia with the Scottish Women’s Hospital Unit. has received a medal, and we send her through the maga­zine our heartiest congratulations. In writing to her mother she says “We had a visit before nine o’clock this morning from Prince Dolgo­roudoff and several Generals and we were all given medals ; they are silver with orange and black ribbon.”

We also congratulate May Wyld (Florence Maria Wyld), Member of; the Order of the British Empire. For work in the Secunderabad Hospitals for sick and wounded from Mesopotamia.

Ena de Jersey sends a, very interesting account from Guildford of her work in a hostel for National Service Girls working. on the land. She says “This hostel started on June 14th as a training centre, but now that the colder weather has set in it is more of a depot where they come whilst waiting for places. My friend, Miss Perrean, is the superintendent and I am her A.D.C.; in other words. I am the house parlormaid, general bottle washer, and her secretary into the bargain. I simply love the life, though it is pretty hard work. There is no time to be bored with its monotony, as we live in a perpetual state of never knowing what is going to happen next. On the whole we have some very nice girls. They are mostly drawn from the servant class, they wear the breeches and overalls and are called by their surnames. The day’s work is as follows: Getting up bell at 6 a.m., breakfast at 6.45, then one girl stays at home each day to help in the house, which has to be done from top to bottom every day, the girls have to be on the farms at 8 a.m., and they take their lunches with them; they knock off work at 5 p.m., and come home for a big meal at 6 o’clock, known as tea, though they have meat and pudding and cups of tea.”

May Bailey writes: “At present, I am working at the County Second­ary School, Wolverton, Bucks, as an assistant mistress. I have full charge of the domestic work, which includes cookery, housewifery, laundry and needlework. For this work I have a special building adjoining the school, which is quite new. This work was not done in the school previous to my appointment. As all forms (I.-VI.) take domestic work, most of my time is occupied with it. The Food Control Committee for this district arranged for war lectures on economy in food to be given in this neighbourhood and district. These lectures they kindly invited me to give, I have just completed them, three a week for the last seven weeks.

A. Currey is working hard with Girl Guides in Capetown.
W. Harvey-Jones is also doing excellent work with Girl Guides at Bexhill.
P. Riddle has gone to Miss Jones at Grahamstown to teach mathematics in her school.
B. Knowles is housemaid in a hospital at Harpenden
S. and H. Toms go alternate months to the officers’ hospital at Watermouth Castle. ‘
E. Charlton (Brown) is living in Maida Vale, her husband is in hospital in London.
D. Wilson is driving the Salisbury Red Cross Ambulance.
Miss Ashford has gone for six months to a military hospital in Norfolk.

Miss Fairclough has been moved to Alexandria and is taking charge of the invalid kitchen at the 78th General Hospital. It is a Convalescent Hospital, and she starts her day by making 47 pints of “Benger.” All milk having to be boiled on paraffin New Perfection stoves, and she only has six burners!

M Saunders, Irene Morrice and H. C. Livesay are kitchen maids at the Salisbury Red Cross Hospital.

A. Hubbock (Parish) is living in Glasgow and helping in the War Depot.
L. Delacombe is still working at munitions at “Park Royal.” Her particular work is overlooking the girls who are making cartridges.
D. Moore is working at the Art School in Edinburgh.
Enid Carter has gone to Paris to be with her father for six months.
Miss Luce and Miss Williamson are both teaching at the “Ladies’ College” in Jersey.

Miss Ralph is to be house mistress of a new boarding house at Miss Jones’ School in Grahamstown.
M. Knowles goes to the Y.M.C.A. canteens at week-ends and also works at a War Depot at Harpenden.

Janet Dennison is working as Quartermaster’s Orderly at Christ­church V.A.D. Hospital, and loves the work.

Helen Theodosius is studying the Froebel system of teaching in order to take up kindergarten work. She is also hoping to continue her music with Miss Fanny Davies, but at present is not allowed to use one of her wrists for playing.

Madge Glynn is studying shorthand and typewriting to fit herself for secretarial work.

Rosamond Burne (Wolley-Dodd) sends a jolly photograph of her little girl aged 16 months, and has a wee son too now. She says Marjorie is nursing in Cheshire, and Nancy is a V.A.D. in France.

K. Lewis tells of her jolly family of boys all enjoying their life on the farm at Bentley and helping to cut up between 16 and 30 bushels of swedes a day. Her husband has got the D.S.O. and was twice mentioned in despatches last year. We heartily congratulate her and him.

Vera Morrison is working every day on a farm, milking and butter making; and poultry, taking a man’s place, and her baby is all the better for living in the country. Her address is Elmbrook, Clear Down, Woking.
Ivy Hutchins is nursing at Chatham.
Norah Montgomery is very busy at canteen work, clerk’s cafe, and packing parcels for prisoners.

Quite a large company of Godolphinites are at the School of Medicine: Miss Hynams de Tiel, Merell Middlemore, Dacre Alexander, Eva Bartram, Dolly Turner.

Miss Wyld and Mrs. Everett “We said good-bye as usual to Miss Wyld before the Christmas holidays, and we were destined never to see her again. The loss, however, was compensated for by the punctual arrival of Mrs. Everett at the beginning of the term. We celebrated the exchange on the first, morning of the term by a prolonged and hearty clap for (xciwra1 and i1lrs. Everett, and again through the pages of the magazine we want to convey to them our very heartiest best wishes. General Everett has gone back to Salonika after his short leave, and Fawcett House has been able to welcome Mrs. Everett back for a time.

Old Girls’ News – Christmas 1916

U. Barrow is living at home, and working half time as a V.A.D. nurse at the Cooden Camp Hospital, about two miles from Bexhill.

Ella Burden writes from No. 1, B.R.C. Hospital, A.P.O. 811, B.E.F., France: “I thought I would like to send you a line to tell you how very happy I am out here, and thoroughly enjoying my work. I am very fortunate in being in such a lovely hospital, and in such a nice little sea-side town, in the midst of pine-woods. We are now very busy, but so far I have been able to stand it quite all right. It is quite likely I may meet some old Godolphin girl out here, though I have not been lucky enough to do so yet. The nurses all live in a big hotel close by, and also any relations whose people are on the danger list. The hotel life reminds me of school, everyone is very kind and we are able to spend our off-duty time together.”

Doreen Caton is collecting for the War Savings Association at Beckenham in two long roads, and likes the work. She is also teaching at the House of Compassion, where all the teaching is voluntary,

Violet Christie passed the examination for the Sanitary Inspector’s Certificate in January, and the examination for the Public Health Diploma in May, and has been elected an Associate of the Royal Sanitary Institute. She has been working under the Lady Almoner at the Brompton Hospital. She journeys about all London and the suburbs and finds her work very interesting.

Constance Keane writes: “I have been working on the land from 6.30 a.m. till 7.30 p.m, every day. The work has been really rather interesting, since I was the only woman there, and the only person of a non-labouring class, so I got a good insight into farm life. Feeding fowls, pigs, and calves, milking cows, tending sheep, cleaning stables, driving and harnessing horses, threshing and harvesting, fell to my lot, so I now feel quite an expert at farming ! It was very strenuous work, and as a result I am very strong and muscular.”

Dorothy Kent tells us of her brother’s wonderful experiences in the battle of Bernafay Wood, and also in the battle in Delville Wood. She writes from Durban and says:- “A fortnight ago we had such interesting letters from my brother. He gave us very full descriptions of both fights. He really had the most marvelous escapes. In Bernafay Wood they had a very bad time, and were without food or water for several hours. When the rations came up a high explosive set them on fire, and so they got nothing. A shell fell just on the parapet of their trench but fortunately didn’t explode. In Delville Wood a shell shot away the bottom of my brother’s pocket book and split his tunic across the chest. Another shot off his gas-helmet, and finally at 8 o’clock in the evening a huge shell burst beside him and blew him several yards. It quite stunned him, and he lost control of his limbs, so he was sent to Rouen Hospital. He is still there, but I don’t think it will be long before he is back with the Regiment. Every single friend we knew in the Regiment has either been killed, wounded, or taken prisoner. The South Africans have done splendidly, but they have suffered very heavily.”

Lilian. King has got a very interesting job at the War Hospital Supply Depot in Hove : clerical work connected with the Prisoners of War Relief Fund. They are sending cases and parcels of invalid comforts to 124 Prison Camps in Germany. Turkey, and Bulgaria, as well as to numbers of individual men. She says the majority of the parcels are acknowledged by the men, which is satisfactory. “The letters are intensely interesting; we had one from Wittenburg the other day, enclosing photographs of the monument erected to the British and French who died there, and the grave-yard with all the little wooden crosses. The photos are so clear that one can read all the names on the monument. Last week we had the first letters from Bulgaria-from Philippopolis and Sofia they seem to be quite happy there. Some of the letters from Germany are cruelly censored. One man wrote: ‘We should be very grateful for–‘ and the rest was crossed out. Another said: `I regret to tell you that since you last wrote orders have been issued that-‘ and then all was scratched out.”

Dorothy Lowe is working at the War Hospital at Clopton, near Stratford-on-Avon. She tells us that her brother has come home from Australia to enlist, and has joined the London Electrical Engineers.

Margaret Fawcett says:- “I am at present in Russia, working under the Scottish Women’s Hospital, and altogether having quite a good time. The unit is divided into two parts, the hospital staff and the motor transport. Edith Faithful is in the latter. It was so nice to find that she was coming out with us when I met her in Liverpool before we started. I am in the hospital part, and my duties are many and varied, chiefly to do with the mess. I had no idea that Natasha lived at Odessa, so was pleasantly surprised when she came to the Sanatorium the first morning we were there with several other English girls to take us about. They were perfectly splendid. I’m sure it must be a very tiring job to interpret for several eager people who want to know everything, but they never seemed to get tired. Altogether we spent the most enjoyable four days of our journey at Odessa. Natasha was very keen to come with us, but of course she can’t leave her father and mother. Mrs. Harris was extremely kind, she said that if any of us get ill we are to go back to Odessa, and she will take care of us. At present we are under canvas in a very nice little camp, but have no patients in the hospital. We only arrived from our base hospital on the 11th, and the 1st Serbian Army Corps, to which we are attached, has gone into reserve, so that for the present we shall have nothing to do unless we nurse Russians. We had one fearful night at the base. About 89 wounded arrived before we were properly ready. There were one or two bad cases, and three or four died, but the majority were only slight cases and were evacuated within three or four days. Our little hospital, with its staff of 12, has left the base to be nearer the Front, and now that we are here the Serbs are not fighting, so we do not know at present what we shall be doing. The weather is excellent, and camping out is most enjoyable.”

E. Villars writes: “I have changed my address and mode of life since you heard from me last. I am a general farm labourer on this farm, and have been here for nearly a month, after training for a month at the Seale Hayne College, Newton Abbot. I work from 6 to 6, milking about six cows and doing various odd jobs, such as apple picking, mangold loading, cleaning stalls, and just occasionally driving cattle about. I like it very much, though there are minor drawbacks. I had a very good time at Newton Abbot. The College is new, and is not properly fitted up-only the servants’ quarters are opened to take 14 girls. We had very good instruction and got quite into the way of farm work there. Mr. Crumpler, my present employer, wrote to the Principal to ask for a girl, and I applied as I have some friends living about eight miles from here.”

Miss Newbold has been in France just a month and has signed on for another six months. She helps in a hut with one other nurse, as the whole of the hospital is under canvas.

Kathleen Newbold is nursing in one of the V.A.D. hospitals at Tunbridge Wells, and Dulcie Chancey is in the same hospital.

Marjorie Newbold helps a good deal in the different Canteens in the town. One of their gallant brothers has been killed, and their four other brothers are all fighting.

Iolanthe Wilson has just passed her test successfully in the Admiralty (Intelligence Department).

Muriel Dibben, in writing to us in the summer from South Australia, tells us that one of her brothers was one of the ten men picked out of his Regiment to stay to the end in Gallipoli. She says: “He never thought he would get out alive; it was marvelous how they managed to bluff the Turks.” Her other brother also enlisted.